Reflections

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  1. Mica

    Warm wishes to you on Prayer Tuesday 🙏📿

    2 months ago
  2. O.Christina

    Trying to help with small things I can do; reducing using resources unnecessarily, like sparing water and heating; unplugging the rooter in my office at night; walking short distances instead of taking the car, drinking tab water or filling it into a durable stainless steel water bottle (which we are fortunate to be able to) instead of buying one-way plastic water bottles; speaking with the owner of our little garden about a very effective and sustainable way to help the soil store water (called “terra preta”), where ground and moistened coal is added 1 : 10 to the compost we all collect here in our house with 6 parties, which then can be brought out into the soil after fermentation and this relatively simple procedure seems to strongly increase the capacity to store and provide water for the plants. This seems to increase the fertility of the soil lastingly and intensely; which then in turn may lead to water conservation in our community during the excessive periods of heat and drought like the plants had to endure this summer.

    2 months ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      Thank you for mentioning this, Ose. I have not heard of this technique, “terra preta.” It sounds wonderful!

      2 months ago
      1. O.Christina

        Thank you, dear Holly! Yes, this seems to be a possibility to really do something to enhance and preserve resources in the same time, almost a win win situation when looking at the climate changes we have to consider ahead in our time 💚🙏🌱 To those who might be interested, there is a very informative website in english, here the link: http://biochar.info/?p=en.terra_preta

        2 months ago
  3. Erich617

    I live in a city, but my neighborhood has a very large park and a good amount of foliage. During summers, especially, heat in my area can be pretty brutal, and I often think what a benefit the shade from those trees is.

    My area is experiencing drought conditions, and I had seen a post on social media from a local nonprofit about watering trees that are not near sprinklers or some other water source.

    Even watering one that isn’t within a few feet of my house is a challenge. Walking my child to school each morning, we pass by one particular tree (an oak, I think) that seemed healthy enough to save but in need of some water. This tree is also right near a bus stop that I use sometimes and a stop light that people often use. I figured that it provides valuable shade for our community.

    So, a few months ago, I started filling a tub with water (mostly collected while doing things around the house) and walking it over to this tree in a wagon every few weeks. (Since I can’t safely drive to the tree, this is the only way that I can think of to get water to it.)

    I told my child about it on the way to school, and she wanted to come with me. I had been doing it in the evenings after she was asleep because less water would be lost to evaporation, plus I didn’t want to drag a wagon full of water down the street in the sun on 100°+ days. Now that the seasons have changed, and the night begins earlier, I have been able to take her with me, and she named the tree Light Tree.

    2 months ago
    1. Barb C

      This is wonderful. Thank you for doing this–direct action that makes a difference.

      The heat island effect you describe is more severe in poor neighborhoods, especially those affected by redlining and racist housing policies. Being explicit about those effects and working to address the harms in my professional life are ways I try to make a difference. Those efforts can feel more long-term and remote.

      2 months ago
    2. Holly in Ohio

      What a beautiful story! Thank you so much for sharing with us. 🌳

      2 months ago
  4. Robin Ann

    I have always been a nature lover and outside person. I encouraged my son to study environmental studies for his bachelor degree. Gratefulness inspires me to be very aware. About a year ago I saw a program on coral reefs and why they are dying. All I could do was cry, had no idea. Trying to focus on the awareness of climate change is something I post often on social media. My faith helps me be very aware of the needs of the poor around the world and I have on often volunteered or have given to organizations that help the poor in my community.

    2 months ago
  5. Don Jones

    Gratefulness helps with perspective. The question is, what is it that encourages me forward? Is it fear? Or is it a deep wonder about full potential? Is a broken tea bowl a problem of disposing of waste and lament for loss? Or, is it a creative kinsugi opportunity to make something even more beautiful from the pieces and joy?

    2 months ago
  6. Barb C

    I don’t think it was gratefulness that originally inspired me to do this as much as it was concern for the effects of the modern way of life– Western life that is. Concern that is now fear and trepidation because of the accelerating climate change and not only what I’m likely to encounter in my lifetime but what will happen to my children and all the people of the world who didn’t contribute to this disaster but bear the brunt of the effects.

    2 months ago
  7. dragonfly

    This might end up being none of those mild and optimistic posts. The question is very timely for those who celebrated Canadian Thanksgiving yesterday. And, no doubt, there is a lot to be thankful for. It also is one of those days that clearly shows how careless and brutal we are with this beautiful Earth, how greed and profit drives a great portion of humanity and how blissfully unaware humanity can be of this. The turkeys sure have no reason to be thankful for the nightmare they have been through before ending up on millions of plates. I will leave it at that. But the turkey stands for what has gone wrong with our relationship to Earth and all who dwell upon it. Needless to say, that one act on behalf of my cares and concerns for the Earth and our global family is to not participate in massacres of any kind as much as I can and trying to halt them as much as is in my control. I’m so grateful for this Earth and how nature works in balance when undisturbed (and even when disturbed as climate change reminds us). It makes me upset to see carelessness and complete lack of concern. Trying to follow the stoic philosophy figuring out what is in my control (very precious little) I’m inspired to act in my very small realm, be aware of the bigger realm I have no control over and NOT get upset but accept the facts as such.

    2 months ago
    1. Mica

      Thank you, dear dragonfly, for your heartfelt post 🙂 . Maybe I should forego the turkey thigh I tend to eat at my solitary thanksgiving dinner?? My ex gets thanksgiving with the kids – but I get Christmas!!
      ‘Stoic philosophy’ intrigues me – I’ll google it and see how it might be helpful.
      One thought I have is that it’s not useful for me to add to the unhappiness in the world by being unhappy over things I seem to have no control over – or would I do good things if I ‘encouraged’ myself to suffer??

      2 months ago
  8. Charlie T

    I have always been drawn to nature and felt connected to the earth. And have always been aware of our impacts. At sixteen, I told me mother I wanted to be a vegetarian. She gave me the book “diet for a small planet” and when I moved out of her house a year later, I stopped eating beef and other mammals. I have continued this and still feel it’s an important contribution. Although, where I live, there is local grass fed beef readily available and I will buy it and cook it for others occasionally. I guess being aware of the impacts of my consumption is my action and I try to live as lightly as I can.
    And don’t get me started on dairy industry 😲😁

    2 months ago
    1. Eeevvv

      I’m vegetarian since I was 18 and at first I chose this path because I knew I didn’t need the death of any animal to feed me, I am lucky enough to have a lot of other things to eat. Nowadays I’m more aware of the conditions of our planet and I’m grateful for the choice of the younger me!

      2 months ago
  9. Eeevvv

    This morning I was journaling three things I am grateful for and I found myself reflecting on how much “too much” I had and used in my life. Lately I have been analyzing this thought very often and every time I try to remove or diminish something, sometimes it is a small thing, sometimes it is a big thing but they are all unnecessary things that Mother Earth may not appreciate – I do not want to be an ungrateful daughter!

    2 months ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      This is wonderful, Eeevvv. I am also de-cluttering, what I like to call, “lightening up,” because it truly does lighten the soul. 🙂

      2 months ago
  10. c
    carol

    Gratitude, awe and compassion may be vehicles to expand the sense of self, to come to a fuller intrabeing: the me in we. If so, then finding compassion for whatever I may be suffering: accepting, observing, naming the facets of the experience, sensations, emotions, thoughts, desires, conditioning, understanding the need that is calling to be met, may lead me to that end- gratitude for expanding sense of self that enables moving closer to expressions of intra-compassion.

    2 months ago
  11. Holly in Ohio

    Among other things, I have accepted a challenge not to turn on the heat until November 1. I live in Ohio, so it has been getting cold here and sometimes the days are in the low 50s (F), but I have been thinking about the natural gas shortage, both from the perspective of European households that may go short this winter, and from the perspective of greehouse gasses and what we are doing to the earth. So I am figuring out other ways to keep warm without using much energy – layered clothes, throw blankets, hot water bottle, hot drinks, letting sunshine in to hit the floor and covering windows at night, socks and slippers, and I keep moving. 😊 My cat helps. When I sit, he sometimes sits on my lap.

    2 months ago
  12. Lisalisasmile

    Gratefulness inspires me to make more conscious choices and want to do better for our earth and family❤️ It makes me really think and appreciate how much I have and how blessed I am so I really want to help when I can, do the right thing and take care of our earth and family😍

    2 months ago
  13. Antoinette

    Gratefulness inspires me to slow down and notice how I have everything I need in the present moment. It shows me that I can be more aware of my cravings and desires and to not act on them. I think it was Mahatma Gandhi that said mother Earth provides all of our needs ,but not all of our greed.
    When we slow down and really see that a lot of our choices are about our bottomless pit of greed – maybe we can stop hurting our Mother Earth? We can make better choices for each other and our lovely family.

    2 months ago
    1. Eeevvv

      That’s a beautiful quote that I’ve never heard, thank you, Antoinette!

      2 months ago
  14. EJP

    Gratefulness inspires me to live simply, give more and take care of the earth in all ways.

    2 months ago
    1. Antoinette

      Ejp – you said it! Much better than me ! Thanks 😊

      2 months ago
  15. Avril

    Out of gratefulness for this planet and it’s limited resources, I am a vegetarian. I try to buy products that are American, sustainable, and nontoxic. I do this with as many things as I can do from cleaning products, beauty and clothing. I spend a great deal of time in nature and bringing others there as well.

    2 months ago
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