Reflections

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  1. Javier Visionquest

    “I hate my job!”, cried toothbrush
    “Bitch, please. . .”, replied toilet paper

    2 years ago
  2. Kristi

    Lately this could definitely be true! My bad days are typically little nuances. I’m lucky to have a loving family, house to live in and food to eat. So many people would be extremely thankful for just the basics. This question really does remind me how blessed I am!

    2 years ago
  3. devy

    I can sometimes think that I’m having a difficult day full of worries, what I can’t do or have but then all I have to do is put myself in the thoughts of others whether here or in other countries look at at their situations and realize how lucky and fortunate I am. I remember our trip to the backhill villages of Morocco. The people live in cave buildings, have no running water, just got electricity, still till the land and raise animals as their forefathers did. They are living in poverty but I noticed how happy they were, how they were all smiling and appreciative of what they have. I have friends of mine who are going through difficult financial or personal health problems but I am still financially ok and have my health. I have running water, have the ability to get groceries and live comfortably. My life is far from being difficult even though the social isolation and financial side is a little tight. I am grateful for myself and try to reach out to others and help others who are going through difficulties.

    2 years ago
  4. Malag

    I am fortunate to have basic needs met, and some. A good day for so many is finding enough water, food and shelter. It is easy for me to take all that for granted particularly where my hard day ignores all of that and focuses solely on what went wrong. A wider perspective is a beautiful thing.
    There’s another leg to this question though. If you put two people of similar backgrounds through the same experience they could have totally different feelings about how it went. Perspective again!

    2 years ago
  5. Don Jones

    This is an important practice in my view. It seems to me the whole cosmos is in perfect balance, yet my wee problem all of a sudden becomes bigger than the perfection of all creation. Go figure.

    2 years ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      I had a friend named Dave. He was in his late 70’s and 80’s at the time I knew him. I would watch him sometimes when he would talk with young children. He would listen so carefully to them. Any little problem they expressed he would listen to intently, whether a stem on a flower they had was broken, or anything.

      But this was marvelous when you know that Dave had been a prisoner of war at Stalag 17, and had seen and suffered many horrors. That he still would often wake up screaming. But he set that aside. Each day was about the present day. He wasn’t a meditator or a philosopher, yet somehow he “got it.”

      It touched my heart that Dave understood the relativity of woes, and that he genuinely just cared about people. He never discounted someone’s problems because they were too small. Never told anyone to “get over it.” Never looked away, either, but instead listened like that moment and that person speaking was the most important thing in the world.

      Thank you for reminding me.

      2 years ago
      1. Trish

        What a beautiful story to share, Holly💜

        2 years ago
      2. sunnypatti48317

        Thank you for sharing that, Holly.

        2 years ago
  6. expati

    In general, as things seem to get more and more difficult for most people, life for me gets better. Sometimes I feel guilty about this, but mostly, I am grateful that at 77 years old, I still feel young, healthy, and curious about life.

    2 years ago
    1. sunnypatti48317

      Yes! One of my mantras is “my life keeps getting better.” I still deal with disappointments and not-so-fun situations, but overall, it really does keep getting better. I love it!

      2 years ago
  7. Dusty Su

    I worked for ten years in the third worst prison in the world, which housed up to 8,000 inmates with minimum sentences of 33 years. I often used to say when stuck, struggling, screaming at some of my truly terrible situations, they’d be glad for this opportunity of problem solving in such a setting. I’ll suck it up and do it bravely for them.

    2 years ago
    1. expati

      How does one measure which prison is worst?

      2 years ago
      1. Dusty Su

        Sentencing, lack of legal representation, over crowding, healthcare facilities, disease, brutality, corruption, forced free labor….for starters…there’s more, much more…but you probably get an idea.

        2 years ago
      2. Don Jones

        The one we sit in.

        2 years ago
        1. Dusty Su

          That is true, but there are actual human rights measures for actual prisons for actual people stuck in them. Of course, suffering can be subjective, but the measuring stick for what can break a person was very loaded within the developing countrys’ prisons I worked in, some supposedly less worse than the one mentioned above, yet incredibly brutal in other ways. I have also been privy to information about some first world prisons, which you would think would be better, but come with their own set of what we’d all call a long visit to hell. Very often these people should not have been incarcerated, or were given inhumanely long sentencing in unbearable circumstances. A part of the PTSD I experience is from the years working with other’s extreme suffering, from victim, perp, to the law enforcers within the “legal” system.

          2 years ago
          1. Ed Schulte

            These are the words I would post on the entry doors of every prison.

            “THE PRISON GUARDS BECOME THE PRISONERS….EVERY TIME”

            I do not advocate for abolishing prisons BUT to those who turn them into systems to please their sadistic desire ……be aware! They will come back to you seven times over.

            2 years ago
          2. Don Jones

            The ability of some humans to inflict epic suffering on fellow humans both directly and indirectly (by designing and implementing systems) is shameful. I sometimes muse to myself that alien life probably stops by and watches for a while and says, “no, I think we will pass this one by”.

            2 years ago
  8. Ed Schulte

    We are all here to get our lessons in life and progress to higher planes of existence. “One persons Shell Hell is another persons Shell Heaven”.

    FEELING is relative notion and must be respected as private unless requested otherwise. i am not going to “imagine” what another person is “really hard day”-ing but I will emanate a “Blessing” ( sphere of Rosie red light ) or two , and if their BE-ing-ness detects that Blessing ..then perhaps they will open to more light. Their own internal light

    2 years ago
  9. Linda

    I never take for granted my good fortune to have all the things people have mentioned.

    2 years ago
  10. John T

    Reminds me of the following quote by Helen Keller, “I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet.” Not often enough do I think about the kindness of so many people who’s shoulders I now stand on.

    2 years ago
  11. L
    Lauryn

    A hard day for me might be my boss giving me a hard time for not getting cases filed fast enough. But he does that while I’m sitting at home, safe from Covid, with plenty of food to eat, no money stress, in good health, with a roof over my head. Everyone’s perspective is different. It’s an easy question to answer, though difficult to keep in mind always in the moment— we get caught up in our emotions.

    2 years ago
    1. s
      sb

      I quite agree – you have taken the words from my mouth!

      2 years ago
  12. LeanIn

    With so much pain in this world, it seems obvious that I am privileged to live the way I do.
    I try to reach out with kindness to others because I don’t know what their day, or their life, has been like.
    But on the flip side, our feelings are real. If we are having a “really hard day”, we can still acknowledge it without needing to feel guilty all the time. I think that gratitude practice continues to help me live in the present moment.

    2 years ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      I’m glad you said that, Leanin.

      2 years ago
    2. s
      sb

      I couldn’t have put it better myself. Now I don’t need to write my own comment!!! You have perfectly written what I would have done!

      2 years ago
    3. GratefulOne

      LeanIn, I like what you said about feelings

      2 years ago
  13. sparrow

    I think about this all of the time . . .
    I wake up every day feeling safe.
    I have food at the ready in my refrigerator.
    I have a clean toilet that flushes.
    I have a toothbrush, toothpaste, and soap.
    I have the ability to take care of myself.
    I have clean clothes.
    I have a table to sit down at,
    and chairs.
    I have a home that shelters me from the weather.
    I have garden space where I can work.
    I have books to read, television to watch,
    and internet to teach and entertain me.
    I have freedom of choice.
    I have spare time.
    I have a car to take me just about anywhere.
    I can afford to pay my doctor.
    I have the luxury of cats and a man who loves me.
    I have paper to paint on and write on.
    I have light in the darkness at night.
    I have clean, warm sheets to sleep on,
    and body contact with those I love.
    I am grateful for all of it.

    I have no business
    complaining about anything . . .
    my small misfortunes
    are nothing to what most of the world suffers.

    2 years ago
    1. Palm

      How beautiful, Sparrow. Thank you <3

      2 years ago
  14. Mike S

    Whatever anxiety or depression I might feel from time to time does not compare with what my older brother is going through with dementia nor a nephew of my wife call due to diabetes last two legs.

    2 years ago
  15. V
    Vincent-Edward Ciliberti

    Indeed, a really hard work on my side might satisfy others vying for updates/replies/ and what the other person might have been expecting., thus actually feeling like a good day to them.

    2 years ago
  16. k'Care-Reena

    I have a Book club meet once a week and one of the attendees was extremely emotional and experiencing self doubt. She was pointing out all of the bad and belittling her achievements. She was doing this with a baby in her arms. I am unsure if I will be able to carry my own children and seeing her holding the baby made me feel relaxed. Yes she is stressed out and emotionally however she is caring for life. She is a mother a nurture and for someone who has Fibroids seeing woman with children brings me joy and happiness.

    There is light at the end of the tunnel. You will always see light regardless of the room size in the dark the light overshines it. This means to me that there is always 2 sides the good and the bad. This is life ones man treasurer is another mans garbage or something like that hhahah.

    2 years ago
  17. Journey

    I think about this all the time. From migrant workers who trek long distances daily to find work to put food in their mouths, to refugees, to people who’ve lost their jobs in this pandemic and people who have lost loved ones in this pandemic. Every time I go to the doctor or hospital for a minor test, I think of all the people in the hospital who are fighting terminal diseases and literally fighting for their lives and how scared their families must be. I think of people in depression or addiction and how hard each and every day must be for them and their families. I think of people who don’t have good relationships with their spouses or children and how hurt and vulnerable they must be. A random hard day for me brought on my work issues (so grateful I have a job) must seem like a most blissful day to someone struggling. A quote from Helen Keller “I cried because I had no shoes until I saw a man who had no feet”.

    2 years ago
  18. Patricia

    I knew a woman (now long deceased, who had actually been taken as a POW by the Japanese when she was a missionary in the Philippines at the start of WWII) who once told me, “When seeing someone in need , we don’t think ‘There but for the grace of God, go I. ‘ No. Our instinct is to think ‘There FOR the grace of God, go I….’ Our hearts and minds are always one in compassion and identification with those in the most dire of circumstances, and not focused on our own ‘good’ fortune… ” I’ve always remembered that she told me that, and opened my eyes (and heart).

    2 years ago
  19. Carol

    As a much younger person I had a hard time understanding why others did not see things the same way I did. After all, I thought, I only want what is best! It took a long time and a lot of living for me to understand that what I thought was best was not necessarily what they thought was best. Not sure this answers the question but it’s what came to mind.

    2 years ago
  20. Holly in Ohio

    I do think about this. I particularly think about refugees. There are over 70 million refugees on this planet right now. More than 26 million of those are under the age of 18. Most live in makeshift settlements, some are able to get to cities. About 2.6 million of them live in camps, where they are basically… prisoners. No work, no shops, no schools for their children, very poor sanitation, next to no medical care, overcrowded, living in tents in bitter cold and excessive heat, and the likelihood they will spend years there. Many have already escaped violence, lost loved ones, some have been tortured or maimed.

    Please understand that Climate Change is like a macabre game of musical chairs. Just because we are sitting, doesn’t mean that there aren’t progressively fewer chairs. The destruction and desertification of parts of the planet have real consequences. We tend to blame violence for creating refugees and there is that… but the violence usually stems from shortages, and the shortages are driven largely by a hurting planet. Corruption is born out of trying to grab what little resource there are. People need futures.

    Each of us is able to do something to help the crisis, and it doesn’t have to cost us personally. You can conserve resources, purchase local food, waste little, drive less, walk more, eat less meat and processed food, have just a bit fewer clothes that we care for longer, spoil less food in our fridge… all of these things would be good for us, and good for all of us. Our consumption created most of this situation. Shifting our consumption can help the planet mend.

    I feel very blessed. It is random how/where I was born. I drew a lucky card. If you are reading this online, so did you. We are of the 20% most wealthy on the planet.

    2 years ago
  21. Toni

    While reading the responses of people on this site, I see how blessed I really am. I’m retired for 8 years from a job that was creative and productive and very challenging working with adolescence in dance education. Now that I have all this time on my hands I have many choices and I find it hard to create my day every day. I’ve had many bouts with depression all my life and retirement is still a challenge in that area. Structure has never been my forte. Neither has relationships. I’ve been product oriented not process oriented and with the opportunity to recreate my life the lack of structure and motivation is missing. That’s why I joined this site. To find structure and begin my day with gratitude. So what I’m saying is the “free time” that I find challenging I’m sure must look good to others. My only responsibility is to me and my sweet kitten who keeps me from sleeping all day and has been a blessing by waking me up in the morning to jump start my day however that unfolds. I really get to live in the day moment to moment with conscious choices and no distractions. That may seem like heaven to some but for me it has its challenges. I choose gratitude non-the-less with my kitten who helps me discover the newness of each day. I’m glad I have a place to share what my thoughts are about my reality. Living alone with no one to talk to except an occasional relative or neighbor forces me to self reflect on what matters most in life and the people here that chose to read and listen to what I have to say if a gift indeed especially when I am in a good place. So as my little kitten in playing in the background i can slowly start my day with gratitude and openness to whatever unfolds today and hopefully make wise choices along the way.

    2 years ago
    1. pkr

      Toni, thank you for sharing. Sending you a big virtual hug and know that You are not alone. Try to check out the big fat moon tonite, she is beautiful. Grandma Moon sets me right, as do the stars. You are loved. 🙏🌟✨❤️

      2 years ago
    2. Journey

      Beautifully written

      2 years ago
    3. Carol

      Beautifully said. I hear you and I can relate. You’ve inspired me. Thank you.

      2 years ago
      1. Holly in Ohio

        I agree with Carol, very beautifully said. Gratitude can lead the day, Toni.

        I also find lack of structure a challenge, so I have found a way to add a little structure to my life. I start with gratitude here, and then I go to a document I created of a daily “to do” list, and I list some things I will try to do today, that will support my goals. Today I will have things like, gratitude, go for a walk, clean the bathroom, plant seeds, read, make dinner, make yogurt, call a friend (always on the list to reach out to someone). I check them off as I go and as unimportant as this list may seem, it helps me to feel more focused and know I am making progress. It keeps me away from thinking too much and gives me things to do. And I keep the lists… to look back, to find things I’ve missed doing, but also for continuity. I definitely feel better and am more active since starting this. Best wishes, Toni.

        2 years ago
  22. Chester

    It is not what happens today, it is whether or not our expectations of ourselves and others are met or exceeded.

    2 years ago
  23. Carla

    When I’m off the beam & loose sight of who my “Employer” is, then I become stuck in the minutia of my paid job & other tasks at hand. I have a set of tasks each day that can either blend into the cosmic song of healing & nurturing my self, others & the planet or I can join in the cacophony of discord. I’m coming to respect what our cumulative different roles are.

    2 years ago
  24. GratefulOne

    Oh gosh. A deep question. Absolutely. I had a tough day yesterday. Just silly work stuff – numbers down, a project lost. But I know that is so insignificant to others days. I have a roof over my head. I have food. I have shelter. I have clothing. I have family and friends that love me. I am learning and re-learning to love myself. I know that people do not have these things … in my town, state, country and the world. I am so grateful. This was the question I needed today. Have a good day folks!

    2 years ago
  25. Trish

    Often my “hard days” include grueling issues from work: injustice piled upon violence with ragged emotions impacting the decision making of many people, crisis calls in the middle of the night & a ridiculous amount of paperwork. Others might say, “Stop, Trish. You’ve been so incredibly fortunate to have worked with amazing people for over 30 years, they make you use your brain in challenging ways, keep you on your toes & connect you to God. Bonus: you get paid for
    it! “ Truth…..

    2 years ago
  26. Howie Geib

    So I just wrote (and obviously did not post) a 400 word rant in response to this question. I am exhausted!

    We are all different and this is our strength not a source of conflict. We need to find ways to hold hands where and how we are. Women do this better than men in my experience. It is perhaps their hour, as we need so desperately to get this right. So in the sense that the question and the exercise it poses brings us to seeing how much more alike we are than highlighting our differences I applaud it. I despair at ways we diminish the individual power we have from some sense of injustice over how it is more or less than the power of our neighbor.

    2 years ago
  27. Kevin

    This is not difficult to imagine at all. In fact, and not wanting to sound unkind, it’s rather easy to imagine and in fact common place. Next question?

    2 years ago
  28. Michele

    Yesterday was a very busy day at work. Even though it was busy, tons of emails, and issues to be resolved, I am sooooo grateful to have a job. I am aware that there are people who are out of work and so I take a deep breath and make it through another day and am happy where I work and to be working:)

    2 years ago
  29. sunnypatti48317

    My “really hard” days usually happen at work. They’re hard in the sense that I often work 9 hour days and still don’t have enough time to get everything done. They’re hard because I try to prioritize my time between getting administrative tasks done, making sure my team is doing what they need to be doing and happy (or as happy as possible) doing so, helping with any sort of production, receiving, stocking, ordering, and also helping customers. It’s all non-stop. Which is good – I go to work to work! But some days I am just exhausted. And this is where those days become a good day to others – at the end of an exhausting day I remind myself that not everyone has a job, especially in these days of a pandemic, and I am grateful that I can still go to work.

    2 years ago
    1. pkr

      Sunnypatti, I have always tried to have the mindset, while working, no matter how hard & difficult this may be, “I am thankful I have a job.” I work/worked in retail, non stop go go go. Many of my work mates barely did a thing, mgm. Included, I on the other hand know no other way, than to work hard. I was there to work and at the end of the day I had to answer to myself about my performance. Good luck to you, It is hard, all the juggling. Sounds like you have a good attitude & in my opinion that is half the battle. Enjoy your weekend. ❤️🙏

      2 years ago
      1. sunnypatti48317

        Oh, thank you, pkr! The juggling is tough, for sure. I reached out several weeks back to a team leader at our sister store, and one of the things I asked him was how he got it all done. It made me feel a bit better to learn that he often doesn’t! Fortunately, I’m learning to be a great juggler in the process! Hope you enjoy your weekend, too 🙂

        2 years ago
    2. Kevin

      “I go to work to work!” Now there’s a concept, my friend. When you think of it, there’d be a whole lot less whining and moaning in the every-day workplace (excluding oppressive working environments) if more people were able to remind themselves that they “go to work to work.” There is a pervasive work ethic floating around out there that the goal of work is to actually due the opposite, which in the end makes people feel miserable day after day. A few years before I retired people would come up to me and say, “I bet you can’t wait to get out?” And I replied, “No. I love my work.” And I loved it until the day I needed to retire.

      2 years ago
      1. sunnypatti48317

        It’s funny how the ones whining on the job aren’t the ones putting in their best effort. I see it all the time. I’m lucky my team is made up of folks with good work ethic (minus one lazy guy), so I’m grateful for that, too. I know a lot of people who don’t want to work but obviously need to. It’s so weird to me. I can’t imagine not working. I mean, I’ll retire some day, of course, but I do enjoy working! And I love the field I’m in, in the department I’m in. Specialty cheese and all the other things we sell in our dept are fun! And the customer interaction is also fun. I’m really very lucky!

        2 years ago
        1. Michele

          I relate to you on the subject of work ethic. I too love my job and the field I’m in. As much as I love it, I am looking forward to retirement one day too:)

          2 years ago
  30. O.Christina

    Of course I can. I remember the moment when I finally could take back to myself some important wrong perceptions I had constantly projected on others due to very early imprints in my life, which I had not been able to let go of before despite all efforts. The procedure was felt as to be extremely hard, especially the day before I finally could let go of the projection, which had been very difficult for others to bear. After letting go, I was then very happy to perceive that the other felt this as a great relief that finally things fell into place. It was a gift to have been able to let go and I can only apologize and I am deeply grateful to the ones concerned that they have been kindly and lovingly staying at my side nevertheless.

    2 years ago

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