Reflections

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  1. k'Care-Reena

    WHAT HAPPENS WHEN I ALLOW MYSELF TO RISK STEPPING INTO THE UNKNOWN W/ A GRATEFUL HEART?

    At first when I read this question I found myself unsure how to respond. This explains my late entry :). I did a recent meditation and stretch, closed my eyes and asked myself this question from intuition and a love based state. When I did my response was: ADVENTURE, PEACE, EMPOWERING EXPERIENCES AND SELF ACCEPTANCE.

    1 year ago
  2. pln.bee

    i think people create series of decisions each day, and none of us is 100% sure that things will work. so, risk stepping into the unknown with a grateful heart is just part of the things we do to try and achieve things.

    1 year ago
  3. Don Jones

    If you watch a movie and it is predictable, at the end it is, “meh”. Watch a suspenseful movie and at the end it is, “wow”. Stepping into the unknown in anticipation of wow, is my preference.

    1 year ago
  4. L
    Lauryn

    You have no expectations. You put trust in yourself and in others.

    1 year ago
  5. Mica

    ‘Sounds like a good plan. May my heart be grateful whenever I think about the unknown I have stepped into.

    1 year ago
  6. k'Care-Reena

    Faith steps it, hope takes the wheel and peace becomes the destination.

    1 year ago
  7. Pilgrim

    The adventure begins …

    1 year ago
  8. Drew Blanton

    I find out that it’s not so bad. It might even be educational.

    1 year ago
    1. Mica

      Thank you, Drew – it was good seeing you today –

      1 year ago
  9. SK

    It means I have noticed life’s RSVP and I did.

    1 year ago
  10. Antoinette

    Joy!

    1 year ago
  11. Maeve

    Like getting married? That is the thought that popped up for me. Hopefully “stepping into the unknown with a grateful heart.” But I have not been married, so can’t answer that one!

    Much of what I have faced in life, has been stepping into the unknown, grateful heart or not.

    I am planning a trip to visit a friend in Alaska in August, to sail with him for two weeks. That is stepping into the unknown for me, with a grateful heart, and also some trepidation. The grateful part is his offer for me to partake in this sailing adventure in a wild, beautiful part of the world. It seems like a not-to-miss-opportunity.

    1 year ago
    1. Mary Pat

      How wonderful! A new adventure for you….life is filled with great surprises. I wish you well, and blessings to you.

      1 year ago
    2. Mica

      What an exciting opportunty, Maeve!

      1 year ago
      1. Maeve

        Yes, it is.

        1 year ago
  12. Patricia

    “The unknown” is, well, everything in the future, is it not? … everything apart from this very moment in which I am living. So often we assume we “know” what is going to happen this afternoon, but we don’t, not really. I am blithely stepping into the unknown with every breath I take. Now, the question for me is: Do I live each of these moments with a grateful heart, and without fear? Do I live in grateful trust as my foundation?

    1 year ago
    1. devy

      Living each moment with a grateful hear.. food for thought..thanks

      1 year ago
  13. Mary Pat

    In my life experiences, it could go either way…grateful heart or not….a grateful heart is not a magic potion of protection.
    I have taken risks and have had consequences that have been disastrous, but not all…..was it worth it? No. Definitely not.
    Stepping into the unknown with a grateful heart, and with knowledge of the pros and cons is one thing.
    Skipping into the unknown without knowledge and on impulse is downright dangerous. Grateful heart or not.

    1 year ago
  14. DeVonna

    For me the bigger challenge is stepping into the unwanted with a grateful heart. I’ve shared before that my daughter has no contact with us, depriving us of contact with our precious grandsons. I try to be grateful in this situation, but it’s VERY difficult. Have you any suggestions?

    1 year ago
    1. Mary Pat

      I have had this very difficult challenge, DeVonna. It went on for about 4 years, and for me, was a living hell. My daughter was living with a controlling man who took away her whole support system; friends, family….it was awful. I just made myself available, prayed(of course) and kept the lines of communication open. Gave money if needed. Did whatever I could to keep in contact, however I could. eventually, through a crisis, she left him.
      She is now, and has been for years, fine. Our grandkids are alright, and we have relationships with both of them. But it took time. And lots of listening and acceptance. Our grandsons bear the scars, but have come out of it better than I thought they would.
      Hang in there! I will keep you in my prayers.

      1 year ago
    2. Mica

      Peace be with you, dear DeVonna – I lit a candle for you 🕯

      1 year ago
    3. Holly in Ohio

      It is so challenging to cope with this kind of loss. I really don’t know what I would do in your shoes. I suppose I would try to be grateful that they are alive and well, and doing the best they can to cope. And I guess I would keep trying to work on my own happiness. I wish I had a magic wand, DeVonna, as I would give it to you.

      1 year ago
    4. Maeve

      “stepping into the unwanted with a grateful heart”– I agree, that is a bigger challenge.

      1 year ago
  15. Amber Wright

    Beautiful question! Every single time I’ve done this I am WOW’ed by something. Having a grateful heart when taking a risk into the unknown yields the things that aren’t imagined or anticipated to manifest itself. It’s magical for me.

    1 year ago
  16. Holly in Ohio

    I love the unknown in learning situations, and love pushing the edges of my learning, but when I read this question I realized I resist the unknown in the bigger things in life, that instead I am a “find everything out you can,” kind of girl, and the unknown can make me uncomfortable.

    The places I need to embrace the unknown with a a grateful heart:
    the pandemic,
    aging,
    climate change.

    What happens when I step into these things with a grateful heart? I don’t know yet, as I have not tried. I’m not even certain how to approach these things with a grateful heart. Of the three, aging would probably be easiest for me.

    I am interested in hearing how others approach this question.
    Good morning, by the way, to everyone! I could not be here yesterday and I missed y’all.

    1 year ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      p.s….i see i missed the “risk stepping” part of the question! Obviously im not planning any “risk stepping: with covid, so I goofed up my reading of it! I will put my thinking cap back on! Hm :D…..

      1 year ago
      1. Mica

        hee hee, Holly – good point

        1 year ago
  17. Katrina

    I agree with Howie and Kevin on this one. Just because I allow myself to risk stepping into the unknown with a grateful heart, does not mean it is a smart thing to do. On the other hand, I had a professional opportunity that I did not risk taking, leaning heavily the need for family stability at the time (our family was in somewhat of a crisis). I made the decision with a grateful heart and felt good about it. In hindsight, I have thought a lot about what a pivotal decision that was. A different decision would have changed so much, it seems. But it was a decision I had 12 hours to make. Sometimes things like that happen. It’s living with the decision – one way or the other – with a grateful heart, that counts.

    1 year ago
    1. Mica

      Warm wishes to you, Katrina! It sounds like a decision women often make –

      1 year ago
    2. Holly in Ohio

      I like that. “living with the decision – one way or the other – with a grateful heart” 🙂

      1 year ago
      1. Maeve

        Yes, I like that too. And the question does not include “was the outcome positive?” or “was it the right decision?”

        1 year ago
  18. O.Christina

    I don´t know, with gratitude.

    1 year ago
  19. EJP

    Amazing things happen….doors open that have been closed and the world becomes a different place with just one step at a time.

    1 year ago
    1. Maeve

      Can you give an example of when this happened?

      1 year ago
  20. Michele

    Hmm, the word ‘risk’ can be two-fold, it either was a good risk or it was a bad risk… stepping into the unknown with a grateful heart starts off positively. One needs courage to take risks. One could be grateful for having the courage needed to take a risk.

    1 year ago
  21. devy

    With me dealing with anxiety; the unknown is something that I don’t deal with very well. More often it’s the fears of things where I don’t have control of. Rationally I know that I shouldn’t worry about things but subconsciously the opposite happens. Because of this often I am afraid to make decisions even for myself which creates more anxiety. I know where my fears stem from . This is an ongoing battle to learn to evaluate my decisions, make the best ones possible and learn and accept them.

    1 year ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      Very often I relate strongly to what you say, Devy. I used to be a horrible, misshapen knot of anxiety, unable to even function for a while, but I sought out and tried out good advice, and when I found methods that worked, I practiced them to learn the skills, and can say I am (mostly) free today from anxieties. My heart goes out to you because I know how painful and relentless anxious thoughts can be! But you will find your solutions, Devy! I am so certain you will leave your anxiety behind by bits until it is nearly all gone. For me, evaluation was not usually a helpful tool and could often feed the anxiety. Focusing on the parts where I felt control and DOing where I could affect things was very helpful, even if it was “insignificant,” because it gradually built a sense of confidence. If I couldn’t decide a big issue, but could decide what flavor ice cream to buy, then ice cream it was! I turned my back on many things where I did not have control and learned to accept that it is just normal. I got help for things not in my control but where I had to do something, and got those tasks out of the way. In the beginning, for me the DOing was only puzzles, but it distracted me from the spirals of anxiety and interrupted that pattern of thinking, and by little steps I built upon that and returned to normal life. I don’t know if relating what helped me is of any help to you, Devy. You may find a similar path or a very different one, but I wanted to offer it in case there is anything there for you. But I have seen you growing and healing so much, and I have every confidence in you. And if I can ever be of any help, let me know.

      1 year ago
  22. Dusty Su

    If it is the right choice… and believe me, I weigh the pros and cons first, then a whole alternative universe of possibility opens with the jump. No matter how much you research something, make plans, are as grateful as a pig in mud, there are jumping-off by-faith points. At least, so far in my life, there have been.

    Right now I am thinking of moving to Belize to help open a hospice. I have never been there, but have an invitation. Once I leave Australia, there may be no coming back, especially in COVID times. I cannot leave without special exemption status and as things are, could not return easily, if at all! If I stay, I am safe, have my basic needs supplied, and am very comfortable.

    BUT what wonders might unfold if I go? What effects could I have? I could reach how many lives for the better? It’s exciting to think about how I could live and love in a back-to-basics environment, with humble yet meaningful work to see out my days. Especially in a warm climate, by the ocean, no big supermarkets, a bike to get around with, and then possibly leave a small legacy for others to use? I love those possibilities.

    1 year ago
    1. Katrina

      Sounds like you are not blind to the possibilities for good or not either way you go. Just because you take the risk with faith and a grateful heart doesn’t mean the outcome will be pleasant. Being able to accept the consequences of taking the risk with faith and a grateful heart is the next step. There is also a certain amount of freedom in making the decision not to take the risk, but having done so with faith and a grateful heart. This is a big one, my friend. God’s peace be with you.

      1 year ago
      1. Mary Pat

        Well said, Katrina.

        1 year ago
      2. Dusty Su

        Yes, so true Katrina. I am literally dreaming of tsunamis and I am amid them, evaluating them, creating safety for myself and others, and yet having to brave these situations and make decisions that count big time. But there is peace in the midst of the storm as the saying goes. Cheers.

        1 year ago
    2. Michele

      That’s scary and a bit angering the thought that if you left Australia you might not be able to return. My first thought would be family – what if something happened to your Mom? There’s no question you would have to return. I hope you can receive special exemption status so you do not have to put your life on hold because of Covid. These rules are frustrating for vaccinated people who want a return to normalcy. (if that even happens). Good luck Dusty Su – keep us updated:)

      1 year ago
      1. Dusty Su

        Something will happen to my mom 100%. She has Alzheimer’s disease and is 88. This is something I would have to consider as far as timing goes. She is well cared for, but I have been able to take up the slack while locked down in Australia. When I go, it is with the realization that I may not return for a long time, if ever. So, I am not leaving tomorrow, but somewhere after 6 months from now perhaps.

        When I left Australia at age 20 on a one-way ticket to do volunteer/mission work in developing and dangerous countries, I knew there was a great chance I might never return. That was the cost. The last thing I did was eat an apple at the airport, as I figured I may never taste one again. Little did I know that mangos and papaya was a far better trade.

        It seems I have never been called to a playground, but a battleground, which turns out to be a blessed space. Let that be so in this case if it is the thing to do. I’ll keep you posted xxx

        1 year ago
    3. Howie Geib

      Oh this sounds like a very cool opportunity, and of course, difficult as well. There is something Elven about you. A wanderer but not lost. In my case there is always the source of the invitation…it is often the place where the indication is hidden as to what my attraction really is…

      1 year ago
      1. Dusty Su

        Thanks, Howie, yes indeed, wander but not lost. A pilgrim of sorts, feel at home everywhere, but nowhere.

        I find this quote à propos. “Living in a transitional age such as ours is scary: things are falling apart, the future is unknowable, so much doesn’t cohere or make sense. We can’t seem to put order to it. This is the postmodern panic. It lies beneath most of our cynicism, our anxiety, and our aggression.

        Chaos often precedes great creativity, and faith precedes great leaps into new knowledge. The pattern of transformation begins in order, but it very quickly yields to disorder and—if we stay with it long enough in love—eventual reordering. Our uncertainty is the doorway into mystery, the doorway into surrender, the path to God that Jesus called “faith.”” Fr. Richard Rohr.

        1 year ago
  23. Howie Geib

    I mostly draw on confidence born of experience when on the edge of a risk about to jump in or off…I think it would be very difficult to willingly go off on an adventure without knowing that I was willing to risk losing everything. That posture is born of a certain gratitude I suppose and yet, it is not something I would have equated with the drive to undergo the test. There is gratitude in having the chance, the openness to risk must be platformed on a certain trust. Not trust in a particular outcome, but trust in my ability to accept the consequences. There’s winning and losing and then there’s the excitement of being in the game. I am grateful to be in the game.

    1 year ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      I like that thought, Howie.

      1 year ago
  24. Kevin

    Today’s question seems to imply that stepping into an unknown with a grateful heart is to be taken as a good thing? Well, that’s a brush too wide for me to swallow, personally. Of course, being positive about tackling the unknown seems like no-brainer, but not all unknowns that we are forced to deal with in life are pleasant, nor easy. Some unknowns are frightening, dangerous, and potentially catastrophic in nature, and yet must be faced too. And showing up with a grateful heart as my first tool of choice in these situations is, frankly, ineffective, and silly.

    As has been done in the past, I am wondering if today’s question is “keyed” to today’s quote by Yo-Yo-Ma? The quote is, of course, wonderful, but something frequently gets lost on both ends, and meanings skewed, when they are arbitrarily linked together.

    1 year ago
    1. Mica

      And how wide a brush could you swallow, Kevin? I love your mixed metaphor – and your wise interpretation of the question.

      1 year ago
      1. Palm

        Lol Mica

        1 year ago
        1. Mica

          Thank you, dear Palm 🙂

          1 year ago
      2. Kevin

        I know, Mica, not sure what I was thinking there! It may have been too early, even for me!

        1 year ago
    2. Holly in Ohio

      I was wondering about the quote-link, too, Kevin, and not for the first time.

      Out of curiosity, what might be your first tool of choice for going into the unknown?

      1 year ago
      1. Kevin

        Breath. Stay with my breath. that’s usually the first and most effective tool that I pull up in these situations. I used to use it a lot actually with crisis intervention work and when I served on a sudden death response team following tragedies and suicides in schools.

        1 year ago
        1. Holly in Ohio

          Thank you, Kevin. Breath is a very good one to put in the toolbox.

          1 year ago
  25. Christine

    A grateful heart.
    I think my heart becomes grateful when I have the desire to discover new things, when I look around corners, take a different path. I think I find it all too exciting to start with a grateful heart. I step in to the unknow with a curious heart.💛

    1 year ago
    1. Mica

      Curious heart – thank you Christine! I like that. Mine has been a fearful mind, regarding something I applied for, expecting rejection but getting accepted and now worrying about my ability to produce. ‘Curious’ feels like a better approach than ‘grateful,’ tho ‘grateful’ has its merit too.

      1 year ago

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