Reflections

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  1. Misty

    Try not to take things personally, especially if you’re feeling a bit down. Assume the best about people and their intentions, if you possibly can.

    2 years ago
  2. O.Christina

    Yesterday now is today. So today, feeling unusual happy just for no special reason is a gift, which lightens this day and shines onward. Grateful!

    2 years ago
  3. Elaine

    Co-facilitating our Friendly Conversation Group for newcomers as I did yesterday is always heartening and broadening. Their varied experiences and openness and curiosity about their new home always educate and inspire me!

    2 years ago
  4. Malag

    When you’re making adjustments try one thing at a time. Going with two at once can be very tricky. That’s what I learnt from yesterday. In general I gain perspective or not: it’s not something I can plan. But I also know that trying out new things (best one at a time!) often leads to a perspective shift for me.

    2 years ago
  5. RosaD

    That I have to value my health and myself – even if it upsets other people.

    2 years ago
  6. Javier Visionquest

    What does grief have to teach me?

    2 years ago
    1. Michele

      That the sad, heartache, shock, angry feelings come and go but also that love and gratitude follow. Perspective. Peace and love and hug to you.

      2 years ago
      1. Javier Visionquest

        “I sat with my anger long enough, until she told me her real name was grief”

        2 years ago
      2. Javier Visionquest

        No one is ever truly lost who we carry within our hearts. I’ve heard grief called “love that survives beyond death” and I think it might have to do with an expansive relationship to the past and those who occupy that space beyond the temporal horizon, those who are gone from our sight still influence who we are and how we experience the here and now. I cannot continue with that surviving love bound up in regret. I’m not sure, but it’s a place within my own heart where I’m ill at peace. I always appreciate your insights, Michele.

        2 years ago
        1. Holly in Ohio

          I’m sorry for your loss, Javier, and the sadness and anger… a natural part of grief, but not pleasant to endure. I have been sitting some minutes trying to think of something to say to you that would be comforting, but I know there is not much I can offer except to say you can share here, whatever you feel, and I and your other friends here will listen, and keep you company, and care.

          2 years ago
          1. Javier Visionquest

            Thank you, Holly. I’m not sure it’s loss or just a general spiritual malnourishment. I’ve been feeling kind of at odds with just about every community for which I am involved, currently (which means it’s me and not them) and there’s a growing urge to withdraw and reassess. Thank you for the encouragement.

            2 years ago
  7. Mica

    I spent a long time writing an email about something I wanted to share with a group of people, and I want to spend more time doing this with others.

    2 years ago
  8. Sara

    Early this morning I received a call that a very dear and very old friend had just died. Almost immediately, my mind went to guilt that I hadn’t been in touch with her for a few months. Yes, I’d thought to call her and then didn’t. What good would it do for anyone — her, me, her devoted caregivers who were calling to tell me — if I continued to indulge in “it’s all about me” guilt. How grateful I am that, almost on the spot, I saw there was another choice:: to feel in my heart the goodness and pleasure and gratitude for the opportunities we’d been given to be of service to others during our long and loving relationship. When I snapped out of the dark of self-incrimination into the light of Love, I was able to acknowledge, from my heart, the two caregivers who’d been devoted to her — to Shirley — for many years. They loved her. I loved her. I trust, wherever Shirley is, she’s smiling, thanking Life for having returned us to Love.

    2 years ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      That is a beautifully loving share, Sara. Thank you.

      2 years ago
  9. Hot Sauce

    Perhaps today, I can live with a new perspective that says that I can live my day-to-day life without having all the answers.

    2 years ago
    1. Don Jones

      It is always OK to say, “I don’t know”.

      2 years ago
  10. Don Jones

    There are so many…

    I used to think that I walked my dog. She walks me.

    I used to think that meal time was to feed my hunger. It really is a deep time of gratitude for the food (and its sacrifice) to become part of this being.

    I used to think I tended the garden. It tends me.

    I used to think my prayers were to God. It is really the time I am cradled by God.

    And so many more…

    2 years ago
    1. Mica

      Wondeerful, Don Jones – uplifting observations

      2 years ago
  11. Linda

    I have a weekly beer with a group of friends whom I love dearly. Because I had had a migraine earlier in the day yesterday, I didn’t drink any alcohol, and was pleasantly surprised how clear headed I felt when we got up to leave! Even though I don’t ever drink more than 1, it does affect me. Something to ponder…

    2 years ago
  12. Butterfly

    I can’t really say it’s a perspective that I’ve gained today as it’s a realisation that’s developed over time, and that is that love is not something that is mine to give or withhold but is something that I can allow to flow through me. It then feels effortless and I can accept people as they are, warts and all.

    2 years ago
    1. Mica

      Love flows through you, Butterfly – thank you for this observation –

      2 years ago
  13. Carol

    Be here NOW

    2 years ago
    1. Mica

      2 books have that title, Carol – 2 books that I know of : )

      2 years ago
  14. Carla

    I have a broader view of how human kind voyeurs into egregious tragedy more than I knew before. Low flying planes & helicopters have hovered overhead for the past few days. I live in the heart of Minneapolis. Many walk with us in our pain while others just gawk. .

    2 years ago
  15. Toni

    My new perspective I gained today was after getting angry last night over a comment from a relative via text is to deal with it in the moment by asking questions instead of having a delayed reaction that lead to anger and judgement. I will not let the comment seep into my being especially when my relative has no filter and does not share my concerns, convictions and awareness and basically does not care about anything that does not affect her directly. Ignorance is not bliss its ignorance. I have to remember that and not take comments personally. I thought I learned that lesson. I changed the subject to avoid a disagreement or potential argument. I shrunk back. I too am entitled to my opinion and did not speak up. I judged instead. Speaking the truth in love is something I must take to heart and clear up the misunderstanding before bitterness sets in.

    2 years ago
    1. Mica

      How true, but at least you didn’t say anything you regret, so maybe you can take comfort in that 🙂

      2 years ago
    2. Holly in Ohio

      That’s very insightful, Toni. It gives me some insight into a difficult relationship I have right now, too. I’ve also been silent, because when I speak, I can feel myself getting pulled off-balance into annoyance and anger. I will try again to find my own peace on the matter, so that I can speak on it with them without getting drawn in.

      2 years ago
  16. Holly in Ohio

    This morning I woke up to a heavy blanket of snow (about four inches) on top of daffodils, apple blossoms, budding currant bushes, and maple leaves. Though not unheard of to get a late snow in this area, it is typical that it is light and burns off in a few hours. This snow will linger, unfortunately, and has me wondering how the local orchards will fair this year, and wondering how to mitigate climate change in the garden. No answers, yet,

    2 years ago
    1. Butterfly

      Holly, I understand your concern. Here in England we are having a very dry and warmer-than-usual April with the forecast of a very hot summer. I struggle with the heat so not looking forward to that. As for mitigating climate change in the garden I suggest making your own compost from vegetable, paper and any garden waste, plant a tree if you possibly can and have shrubs that can get their roots down so don’t need watering in dry weather. May your garden bloom and grow 🌳🌺🌻🌼😊

      2 years ago
      1. Mica

        Me too – I’m not looking fwd to the heat that will come in the summer – and now there’s a prediction of lots of fires, too, so I’m also not looking fwd to smoke 🙁
        But things could be a LOT worse –

        2 years ago
      2. Holly in Ohio

        Thank you, Butterfly. You are a kindred spirit! When I was in Scotland summer before last, we visited many gardens and a few farms. It was terribly dry that year, and so HOT. So unusual for Scotland. I remember looking at my brother in law’s garden, dry as dust, and thinking how compost and mulch could help retain moisture, but of course in Scotland, why would anyone expect things to be so dry? Of course, you have slug and snail issues in the U.K! So maybe mulch is not a good idea. Here in Ohio we can use it, particularly in drier parts of the country, and I use it at the base of my fruit trees and bushes. I do keep two compost piles at home, and at the farm I have a pile of finished compost 15 meters long and almost as tall as me! So when you said compost, I thought, “Oh, I LIKE this Butterfly!!!!” 🙂 Yes, you are truly a kindred spirit.

        I have three trees to plant that are in pots in my back yard waiting for me to get out there with a shovel. Two are apple trees that were in blossom before this snow, but they have lost all their blossoms to the snow, and you can see their lovely pink petals on the ground. They had only just opened, as had the blossoms on my older apple tree, so I think I will not have apples this year. I have five blueberry bush starts that I brought indoors, since they were not planted yet. It’s mostly the blossoms I worry about. One late snow or heavy frost, and then they don’t get pollinated for the year. I don’t know what I can do about that other than plant a variety of trees. I have one cherry tree and it had it’s blossoms earlier, so I think it will be okay this year. My apple trees are different kinds, but they were all in blossom at the same time. I don’t know. Next time, a garden blanket maybe?

        2 years ago
  17. SK

    Today my perspective has been that “quarter shift” to view life from a different angle. I know where my discontent comes from; where the hard truths are that have to be faced; where beauty lies right before my eyes. My perspective has changed because I am changing- external to internal; square liens to spheres, clockwise to counter clockwise. Look up, she said, for there is the vast expanse of your life; look down she said, for there are your roots of roundedness. May you never forget who you are.

    2 years ago
    1. Mica

      Quarter shift to a different angle – interesting idea, SK. My phone massage person recently led me through a change in perspective that involved a happy color and an unhappy color and a shift to a color what was away from the unhappy color, in the direction of the happy color 🙂
      I was impressed by the idea of just turning slightly away from the unhappy state instead of trying to eliminate it altogether –

      2 years ago
      1. SK

        I like the unhappy/happy color idea- what a new visionary scheme that is. I will now look for more color associations. Thanks for opening up my eyes. .

        2 years ago
  18. Ruth L Eichler

    I was brought to tears watching the “Bloom” animation from San Jose University. It reminds me of a story about Erickson, the noted hypnotherapist who once brought an African violet to a woman whose drapes were always drawn. After a time of having sunshine again in her living room and raising more violets, she took extras to her church for other people. What beauty in tender hearts, in flowers, in kindness, in sunshine.

    2 years ago
  19. DeVonna

    I read through yesterdays answers to the daily question and I was humbled. So many heroic people living ordinary lives under difficult circumstances…

    Blessings to you all.

    2 years ago
    1. Carol

      I felt the same way. I so appreciated the vulnerability and strength such sharing showed.

      2 years ago
  20. sunnypatti48317

    There’s always something to learn/get new perspective on every day! Today, I need some perspective on getting into the study habit again so that I do well with my CCP course. And I also hope to gain some new perspective on the soil where we’ve built our garden. Some of the plants are doing well, but two have already died. And I got veggies that are native to this area, so who knows. I’m off though, and plan to tend to both of these areas!

    2 years ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      If I might say, professional soil tests are cheap ($9 for a basic from Penn State Univ.), and worth it. Try the state university nearest you. You wouldn’t try to medicate an illness without going to the doctor for a diagnosis, and a soil test is that for a garden. Sometimes the issue can be the soil amendments taking the soil in the wrong direction, so the soil test helps figure that out, and finding out what it needs. Other than that, it almost never hurts to add a lot more quality compost or composted manure. I love hearing that so many people are gardening! It gives me hope.

      2 years ago
      1. sunnypatti48317

        Thank you, Holly. Added mushroom compost when I planted everything, along with some organic ferilizer. Everything is doing great! Except the two that died. I’ll test the soil if I find that when I add to the garden others are not thriving. We shall see! It’s just a small garden, so a few casualties are to be expected. I’m just happy there are no pests!

        2 years ago
      2. Toni

        Great advice Holly! Creating your own compost is the way to go also. Starting now for the next season. I have volunteered at a local organic farm and took a certification course in composting and learned tons! I have to get back to the farm this week! Volunteer season is beginning. There is nothing like working the land and learning first hand from farmers.

        2 years ago
        1. Holly in Ohio

          I do compost myself and have been trying to understand the chemistry of it so I can create WEED-FREE compost through something called, “hot composting.” I have run (and hosted college students as a class project) to run two “Berkeley composts.” I highly recommend learning more about it, if you haven’t done it already. Geoff Lawton, a permaculturist, is able to run almost anything through one of his compost piles and have it completely broken down into fine compost in just 18 days. He is widely known for having put a recently dead whole sheep into his compost and it was completely compost-i-fied in a couple of weeks! But preventing weeds is why I’m hot composting, now, instead of the typical way, so it is fabulous for organic farms and community gardens that wish to do their own compost.

          Sorry… I rabbit on when I get into gardening topics! Lol

          2 years ago
          1. Mica

            My guinea pig poop just sits and sits on top of the plants on my balcony, so I started dissolving them in hot water, but then I read about the cool microbes that are in the fresh poop, so now I just soak it a long time, in a container with a cover that has a lid with little holes, to keep out insects. It smells Dreadful when I stir and use it, but it airs out as soon as I pour it on the plants.

            2 years ago
  21. Ed Schulte

    Gained……..

    Faith in Humanity, through the clarity of purpose and presence of seventeen year old Darnella Frazier words when she responded to the attention she received……

    Quoting from news article………

    Darnella Frazier’s impulse to pull out her cell phone and hit record on May 25 had a profound impact.

    The 17-year-old had ventured out to the store with her younger cousin that day when she saw a man handcuffed and face down on the ground. She captured former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin pressing his knee into George Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes — what would be Floyd’s final moments.
    She shared the video on social media and it was soon seen around the world.
    It sparked change in her local community, l
    Frazier was honored for her bravery on Tuesday by PEN America, a nonprofit organization that promotes free expression

    Darnella Frazier responded…

    “I never would imagine out of my whole 17 years of living that this will be me,” she said. “It’s just a lot to take in, but I couldn’t say thank you enough for everything that’s been coming towards me.”

    2 years ago
    1. Toni

      Yes, and thanks to Darnella Frazier justice was served without a trace of doubt. The jurors had to just trust their eyes. Plain and simple…. as some have said event an eight year old girl could see….and she did.

      2 years ago
      1. Ed Schulte

        Yes, but …and I in no way want to promote the idea that justice is revenge, but wish that high powered politicians would keep their comment and opinions non-public or they will obstruct the true / fair / process so that this case will become a bench mark for future cases.

        2 years ago
    2. Holly in Ohio

      Tears in my eyes.
      Thank you for sharing.

      2 years ago
      1. Ed Schulte

        Yes her words are wonderful ….and I pointed out elsewhere they are complete opposite of something very interesting going on in, what could call “behind the vales”, which the media fails see?…….the sir name of the criminal in this case is “CHAUVIN”. Chauvin is root of the words “Chauvinistic” and “Chauvinism”.

        Their meanings are, “feeling or displaying aggressive or exaggerated patriotism. and…Displaying excessive of prejudiced support for one’s own case, group, or sex.”

        Is there “something” trying to alert us to “look” closer?

        2 years ago
        1. Holly in Ohio

          It’s closer even than you realize, Ed. The etymology of the words “chauvinistic” and “chauvinism” come from the same name.“Originlate 19th century: named after Nicolas Chauvin, a Napoleonic veteran noted for his extreme patriotism, popularized as a character by the Cogniard brothers in Cocarde Tricolore (1831).
          Definitions from Oxford Languages”

          2 years ago
  22. Dusty Su

    Death teaches us to live fully.

    2 years ago
  23. Howie Geib

    I have a couple piles of books in my place. All of which I am in some stage of reading. When I pick one up, and start to read, I am immediately lifted out of my limited perspective. This is one reason books, real objects that one can grab, are so important to me.

    2 years ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend.
      Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. 😉

      2 years ago
      1. Mica

        Hee hee – thank you, Holly in Ohio!

        2 years ago
  24. EJP

    This new day brings endless possibilities and opportunities…embrace!

    2 years ago
  25. Trish

    I’m having coffee w/ a friend today (face to face interaction!!) & I am going in to learn about the way she sees life & how she navigates the obstacles. She’s very wise & I look forward to this experience very much.

    2 years ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      Sweet!

      2 years ago
  26. devy

    How much of an affect this pandemic has on people especially those close to you. My wife has been going through moody times over the past while. She is fortunate that she is able to telework from home. Generally speaking, like me she is introverted and usually does not mind spending her weekends home. With the extensive work at years end, trying to find staff to replace those who are moving on has been a challenge for her. Yesterday afternoon during a break we were discussing about replacing our deck and whether or not we should replace it now or wait until after the pandemic is finished. I abruptly mentioned that this could go on for maybe 5 years by the time things settle around the world. After work she approached me and explained that my comment affected her, that she is entering a depression. She admitted that she missed seeing friends in person, going out for the occasional meal, seeing shows at times, probably needs sick time off but if she did take off time, there’s nothing to do so it would not be to her advantage. I listened and recommended that perhaps she should contact her psychologist and have a meeting but she says that she has one in June and doesn’t see any sense in going. I’ve known her difficulties somewhat but I really know now her situation, this is giving me a new perspective and re evaluating how I can be more supportive yet at the same time take some self care. I tell her about my meditation and daily self work but she explains that it’s not for her. I need to be there for her yet be careful of what I say or how I am reacting..

    2 years ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      I don’t know how you and your wife feel about vaccinations, but I, and friends have been vaccinated and we are looking forward to our V-Day, the day we can gather, which for me will be in a week. The CDC has said that if everyone in a group is vaccinated, we can meet indoors and without masks! The groups still need to be smallish, but it means that we will be able to have a small outdoor party with vaccinated neighbors, that we will be able to have family dinners with my kids who have their apartments, and that I can start knitting classes again in my home. You are right this may go on in some form for years, but it is also true that if you vaccinate and others around you do, that it will enter a new phase with much more freedom, and you can do much more than get the deck… you can have friends on it.

      You can check out the CDC or your county health website for specifics and latest recommendations. Good luck to both of you.

      2 years ago
  27. G
    Gregoire

    When life’s challenges seem overwhelming to remind myself that my challenges are nothing compared to the homeless, displaced, and impoverished

    2 years ago
  28. Kevin

    My goodness, sometimes there are just “no coincidences” in these daily questions! I just finished a lengthily heart and soul letter to some of my spiritual elders, speaking what I hope is my truth on a matter dear to my heart. I await their response, and that will determine whatever perspective I have that is new.

    2 years ago
  29. Michele

    That our justice system works:)

    2 years ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      It works sometimes. There have been several recent court cases that were shocking in letting police get away with horrific brutality. But we have also had some court decisions in other matters that were quite hopeful signs. There is still a lot of work to do!

      2 years ago
      1. Toni

        We must keep diligent so that justice is served and not compromised in any way shape or form. Yes, we still have plenty of work to do. This was the first step. No one is above the law and All Lives Matter and that includes Black lives….finally.

        2 years ago
    2. Kevin

      Amen to that, Michele! Thank God…at least in this instance it did work.

      2 years ago

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