Reflections

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  1. Kanshanokimochi

    I deeply love animals, and celebrate my vegan lifestyle. I embrace nourishment without cruelty. I feel connected to earth by my daily choices.

    1 year ago
  2. Malag

    I like this about what Thich Nhat Hanh says and writes: the connection of the food we eat with all life on earth. Or drinking tea for example: he meditates on the cycle of water from clouds to rain to the cup and then the steam is the clouds going up or something like that. I sometimes notice those connections when I eat and drink. That’s how I honour it

    1 year ago
  3. Chung van Gog

    By always looking for ways to share my food with others.

    1 year ago
  4. Hot Sauce

    A practice that I like, which I have borrowed from Buddhism, is mindful eating. When eating, be aware of the texture of the food, as well as its taste, and savor every bite. This is a practice I learned from the Engaged Buddhist practitioner, Thich Nhat Hanh.

    1 year ago
    1. Malag

      Yes. Just saw this after writing something similar!

      1 year ago
  5. M
    Maggie

    Well, considering the fact that food is one of my most cherished parts of life, I would want to honor it greatly. Before each bite, I need to be thankful for the wonderful food and nutrition that I am so blessed to enjoy. I need to thank my food. Also, by thanking my food, it will help heal my relationship with it.

    1 year ago
  6. B
    Brown Rose

    Say grace

    1 year ago
  7. M
    MemoPC

    Giving thanks before each meal. Not being wasteful with food by buying more than can be prepared or putting more on my plate than I need. This topic reminded me of the admonishment as a child to remember that there are others who are hungry. Planting and tending a garden creates gratitude for all the hands that work to bring food to my table.

    1 year ago
  8. L
    Lauryn

    -maintain a vegetable garden
    -buy vegetables at local farmers market & meat from local butcher shop whenever possible.
    -cook meals from scratch instead of buying pre-prepared foods.
    -re-purpose all left-overs
    -choose a new in-season fruit or vegetable to cook with each week (this past week for me was radishes- next week is pears.

    1 year ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      I have been eating both radishes and pears lately, too, Lauryn. It is lovely to experience the seasons of food, isn’t it? 🙂

      1 year ago
  9. H
    Han

    By considering the need for justice around who has access to land, and who works to tend to the land. In Canada so much of our food is grown by migrant workers, who are working in difficult conditions without a path forward. It is hard, essential work, and we depend on these people. To honor this I could look at ways to take action on this issue. Soulfire farm also has a good template of actions for people to take: https://greenhorns.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Soul-Fire-Farm-Action-Steps-Policy-Platform-for-Food-Sovereignty.pdf

    1 year ago
    1. Serafina

      Lovely Han! You can see them featured as one of our Grateful Changemakers here https://gratefulness.org/grateful-changemakers/soul-fire-farm/

      1 year ago
  10. Don Jones

    Bring mindfulness and reverence to its growth, preparation and consumption. I remain in awe as to the daily miracle of how a piece of fruit can emerge from what many would regard as filth (soil manure, compost) transform from a flower on a tree and emerge, then when eaten, transform again into a human being. Zouza!

    1 year ago
  11. d
    dcdeb

    I think that prudence and to remember not to overindulge. Don’t be wasteful.

    1 year ago
  12. Mica

    For some strange reason, I feel compelled to buy single bananas or pairs of bananas that are a bit ‘worse for the wear’ – not terrible bananas but not the best. I don’t really care about helping the supermarket in that way. What came to mind was that the bananas deserved to be eaten. Strange. My bro thought it was about preventing food waste, but it doesn’t actually feel like that.

    1 year ago
    1. Serafina

      I love this Mica! I have felt badly for those bananas before… your reply is so endearing and I am now inspired by you to do the same. Do you know about Misfits Market? https://www.misfitsmarket.com/

      1 year ago
      1. Mica

        Interesting, Serafina, thanks – I have a whole box from Costco of the fig bars in the photo on their website. I’ve wondered if the big batch of ginger candies I bought on Amazon were rejects, because each candy is stuck in the end of the wrapper.

        1 year ago
    2. Holly in Ohio

      I think it is Charlie Brown’s Christmas Tree Syndrome!

      No, I don’t really. Really I think it is a wonderful gesture of valuing food and knowing when you have “enough.” 🙂💗
      You are an example, Mica. Thank you.

      1 year ago
      1. Mica

        Thank you, Holly – I’ll check out Charlie Brown and his Christmas tree!

        1 year ago
  13. orozcoj13

    I can take more time eating to actually appreciate and honor the food. I can be mindful of my eating habits and of course be grateful for the pathway it took to get to me and how it nourishes and fuels my body to be of greater service to the world.

    1 year ago
  14. Marnie Jackson

    Take time when I am eating to remember how the food came to my plate – from the earth, to the farmers, to the transportation, to the grocers….I am grateful for a whole supply chain that I take for granted daily.

    1 year ago
  15. Maeve

    I am reminded of this earth connection when I shop at the local outdoor farmers markets here in town.
    I take pleasure in I returning my coffee grounds to the garden every morning, before making a fresh pot.

    1 year ago
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