Reflections

Please log in or Create a Profile to post a comment.

  1. Erin

    I find when I am practicing gratefulness that I feel better in general. I also notice people around me feeling that positivity as well.

    2 months ago
  2. Antoinette

    An attitude of gratitude transforms my negative minds into a brighter picture of whatever I’m looking at. But I’m not sure if it’s ways a true picture- I mean how do I really know ?

    2 months ago
  3. Dusty Su

    Loving the many multi-faceted responses, thoughts, experiences here.

    2 months ago
  4. Don Jones

    By awakening to the full expression of this Life. Being open and curious to its unfolding. Choosing to be 100% on as a vital Life expression before its Creator. Bowing down in awe and wonder.

    2 months ago
    1. Carol

      My first thought when reading your post: We are life and it is important that we realize it!

      2 months ago
  5. Linda

    I am grateful every day for the many gifts in my life–good air to breathe, lack of war, good friends, loving family.

    2 months ago
  6. c
    carol

    The past few days I’ve been experiencing the fall out of living in a value system that promotes and supports post capitalistic policies and practices that are detrimental to my well being. So, I found myself having to lookup the meaning of transformative power of gratitude. This motivated me to write a letter of commendation to the employer of the Physio Assistant that has attended to my rehab for the past 2 visits.

    2 months ago
  7. Carol

    How have I experienced the transformative power of grateful living? For me, it all comes down to willingness. When I realized that my job is willingness and God’s/Life’s job is transformation, gratitude flowed in and through me. Willingness changes perspective. It opens both mind and heart. I’ve shared this poem before but there is always new visitors to this sight and so I share it again. It was written in the middle of the night in 1995 when I felt that there wasn’t even a single thread of life as I knew it available to me.
    Wings of Willingness by Carol Ann Conner (1995)

    You too can fly. But that cocoon must go! Anonymous

    The Butterfly awakens inside the cocoon – TRAPPED.
    Her wings embedded in her sides – CHAINED.
    Her mind is reeling – AFRAID.

    Every circumstance says she can’t move.
    She bargains; she pleads. But at last, she lets go.
    The power of surrender surges through her.

    Little by little, the darkness begins to fade into light.
    She’s learning to trust.
    At last, she’s embracing true freedom.

    Her prison begins to crumble.
    Her wings begin to spread.
    SHE FLIES!

    Some of us build cocoons from the inside out,
    And the only way to shed them is to let go.
    No amount of digging, scratching, or pushing can remove them.

    Only letting God send those who can comfort and guide,
    Only letting God peel off one layer at a time will constitute real change.
    Transformation is God’s business. Willingness is mine.

    When I can truly let God be God,
    My wings will spread and I will discover that
    I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN ABLE TO FLY!

    2 months ago
    1. lasvistasjeanne

      the simple phrase “My job is willingness” is so very wise and powerful. Thank you.

      2 months ago
    2. Mica

      Thanks, Carol – that reminds me of raising silkworms – they chew their way out of the cocoon. We had some female silk moths left when it was time for us to go on vacation, so I put them out on a bush by the front door, and they seemed to be hanging out happily.

      2 months ago
    3. A
      Ana Maria

      Gorgeous!! Thank you for sharing!!

      2 months ago
  8. Avril

    For me, grateful living has instantaneous results. When I’m open to see miracles, blessings, and awe everywhere they unfold. Every moment of this life is a gift. The cosmic energy of gratefulness connects me with impermanence. People often think that impermanence is fatalistic. It’s the contrary, because things are impermanent they’re so important.

    2 months ago
    1. Carol

      Beautiful! I had a dear friend who use to say, “The only thing permanent in life is change.”

      2 months ago
  9. Charlie T

    This practice is part of the overall transformation that I’m seeking, and among other things, it has helped me to be more expressive.

    2 months ago
  10. O.Christina

    As Br. David expressed it, gratitude is not a feeling but an inner attitude how we chose to meet life. Having internalized this, it helped me especially in most difficult states and moments, as it is like an inner light then which always is on, and even if it may be dimmed in the presence of sadness, it is there. Gratefulness is an immediate transformative force once opening up to it again, consciously inviting Love through this again, altering sadness into presence, inspiring faith and opening the door to being in touch with kindred people and all which is, when this was perceived as almost being lost. Deeply grateful for this huge gift of all the gratefulness-team and you all for the possibility of anchoring this perspective in daily practice and shared joy with all of you who come and who visit here.

    2 months ago
    1. Mica

      Thank you, Ose! “gratitude is not a feeling but an inner attitude how we chose to meet life” 🙂

      2 months ago
    2. Carol

      O Ose, Your description massages my heart and soul.

      2 months ago
    3. Avril

      Beautifully stated

      2 months ago
  11. Y
    Yram

    I have experienced a calm and more awareness for the beauty around me.

    2 months ago
  12. Michele

    I have experienced the transformative power of grateful living by feeling more grounded and at peace.

    2 months ago
  13. Holly in Ohio

    Grateful living practice has a cumulative effect. It got me moving again. It got me talking again. It got me connecting again with nature, food, beautiful things, music. It drew me back towards self-care, and compassion for others, since I was not so much in a shell. There is more to come, I know, so I just endeavor to practice.

    2 months ago
    1. Carol

      My dear Holly, Yes, Yes, Yes.

      2 months ago
  14. Rabbit

    It seems more helpful to me to notice something to be grateful for and then be thankful that one moment has been transformed. Transforming a life will take a while.

    2 months ago
    1. Michele

      Happy International Rabbit Day 🐇

      2 months ago
      1. Rabbit

        Oh my goodness. How special. Will check it out. Thank you. 🐰🐇

        2 months ago
  15. Rabbit

    Thank you Javier. I was feeling the death sentence of osteoporosis. Will try to think of it differently. Not sure how though.

    2 months ago
    1. Mica

      Dear Rabbit, You might have good bone strength even if you have osteoporosis. There’s a new test that measures this – only near Santa Barbara CA thus far – https://www.bonescore.com/. Osteoporosis is about the mineral in the bone, but the strength comes from all the tough squishy cells in the bone. 🙂

      2 months ago
      1. Rabbit

        Thank you Mica. I need this encouragement. Will look at the link. The Women’s Healthcare Network said osteoporosis was over diagnosed and over treated. Maybe this test will help resolve it. I so appreciate you caring and taking time to reply.

        2 months ago
    2. Carol

      Rabbit, I read the article Avril sent and am so thankful that I did. It sounds like you are attempting to second guess the future. Fear does that. As I use to tell those I sponsored in 12-step. If you are in the past or the future, you go there alone because God IS…The strength we need flows in the present moment. If you are struggling to decide whether to medicate or not, I suggest you arise each morning and decide what you will do…take the med or not take the med. Yes or No and then let it go for the day. AND DON’T BEAT YOURSELF UP!

      2 months ago
      1. Rabbit

        Oh, Carol. It is like you know me. Thank you so much. I plan to print out these notes are a daily reminder. I appreciate you and you taking the time to write me.

        2 months ago
    3. Avril

      I think it’s so important to never anesthetize ourselves and say this isn’t scary or painful. But you can be open to what you’ll learn from it. Here’s an article that I recently read about chronic pain, I think it can be used toward chronic illness as well https://tricycle.org/magazine/practice-nonpreference/

      2 months ago
      1. Mica

        Awesome, Avril – I’ve shared it with my friend, too: 🙂 The Practice of Nonpreference 🙂
        When pain becomes just one object among many in our awareness, it loses its power. 🙂
        The author of your link, Darlene Cohen, wrote a book – “Turning Suffering Inside Out.” I downloaded the free kindle sample 🙂

        2 months ago
      2. Rabbit

        Avril,
        Thank you so much. The article has much application to my life now and because of problems in the past. It is so nice of you to think of me. Will print the article to reference later and try to integrate the concept into my life. Again, thank you for caring about me in this way.

        2 months ago
      3. Marie Therese

        Your act of sharing this is an example of how I have experienced the transformative power of grateful living. I live with rheumatoid arthritis and this article is a gift. Thank you.

        2 months ago
      4. Carol

        Avril, Thanks for the link…I so needed it today.

        2 months ago
  16. Laura

    “Transformative” sounds momentous and quick, like a lightning strike. Living gratefully changes me little by little. Every pause I take to notice the beauty and the plenty around me sharpens my perspective, fundamentally altering the way I experience life. Moment by moment I am transformed.

    2 months ago
    1. Mica

      Dear Laura, worms transform into butterflies – slowly 🙂

      2 months ago
    2. Carol

      Laura, A beautiful description of living in the NOW. Thank you!

      2 months ago
  17. EJP

    By living gratefully I live simply, give more, except less and enjoy every moment.

    2 months ago
  18. Joseph McCann

    In the text book sense grateful by definition is expressing gratitude. Gratitude is defined as thankfulness. Thankful is defined conscious of benefit received, expressive of thanks, thankfulness. I had thought I was thankful and grateful. After I was introduced to mindfulness, meditation and gratitude through inpatient therapy and then intensive outpatient therapy for alcohol addiction my concept of this has changed for the better. Over the past 7 months I try to practice daily this, new to me, concept of living. It has transformed this current sober period into less of a “why me” but “lucky me” to be truly grateful for my sober existence. Truly grateful for all the good fortune I have received in life.

    2 months ago
    1. A
      Ana Maria

      So beautiful!! Thank you for sharing your journey. Powerful!

      2 months ago
  19. Anita

    Grateful living is a choice I cultivate much like the parable regarding planting one’s garden. It’s a daily awareness of blessings, sharing my fruits with others and tuning into and listening for the Whisper of guidance.

    2 months ago
  20. sunnypatti48317

    Practicing gratitude helps me pause in situations that before would have caused me to react, get anxious, or upset. Now I know there is a lesson hidden in those things, and having come out of all other scenarios, I know that this, too, will pass. Plus, practicing gratitude feels good!

    2 months ago
  21. Kevin

    I get where today’s question is attempting to take me, but I’m not buying it in its entirety. While I do believe I am grateful for the many things in my life, and say so aloud frequently, being “transformed” isn’t always my experience, nor do I feel that it needs to be.

    2 months ago
    1. Mica

      Thanks, Kevin – You remind me of a Bible study class involving leopards’ spots. I forget the details. Today’s question could be preceded by “have I experienced the transformative power of grateful living?” 🙂But I suppose the advantage of today’s question is that there are answers other than Yes and No 🙂 If your answer is No, you don’t need to post 🙂

      2 months ago
      1. Kevin

        Thanks for your thoughtful words here, Mica. Now I want to hear the full story of leopard spots!

        Today’s Daily Question, “ How have I experienced the transformative power of grateful living?,” strikes me in another way that I wasn’t clear to set into words earlier this morning because I didn’t want the good people at Gratefulness to feel offended. . Today’s question suggests, by its very construction, has a predetermined feel to it, that if I experience gratefulness, that I must be transformed. And that sets off alarm bells in me, that for me, smacks of conscription, and cult-like group talk and behavior. And that was the deeper reasoning behind my initial response.

        2 months ago
  22. Dusty Su

    Yes, ultimately. But not always immediately. Sometimes when in trauma the brain is offline, and nothing gets through other than time to heal. Meanwhile, though, I say thank you by faith. Even when I feel like I am faking it. “Thank you, that this will come to pass… Thank you, it’s not always like this… Thank you, that a year from now this will most likely be insignificant!”

    2 months ago
    1. Carol

      Dusty Su…So much wisdom…sometimes we have to fake-it to make-it!

      2 months ago
      1. Dusty Su

        True but I think we also need to own the poopy stuff in order to work through it all. My right hand, left hand practice of hold the good in one, the bad in the other, and accept life’s inconsistencies, decide how to respond kindly to self and all involved.

        2 months ago
  23. Christine

    For me is grateful living strongly connected with joy.

    2 months ago

Stay Grateful

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Give yourself the gift of free bi-monthly inspiration including uplifting articles, diverse stories, supportive practices, videos, and more, delivered with heart to your inbox.