Reflections

Please log in or Create a Profile to post a comment.

  1. Malag

    I could probably write a list to beat myself up with.

    2 years ago
    1. Misty

      This made me laugh

      2 years ago
      1. Malag

        Happy that it did so!

        2 years ago
  2. Just be

    I would regret
    – the times I could have been kinder
    – the times I failed to love
    – the times I spent doing mundane tasks when I could have been connecting with friends.
    – the books, hobbies, places I never got to because, “I have to ______ first.”
    – the times I went through life on autopilot.
    – the times I wasn’t happy with what I had.

    2 years ago
  3. Kristi

    If I were to die I would regret all the ‘messes’ I left behind. It would make life a little more difficult for those who would have to take over for me. I really should spend time getting my life organized.

    2 years ago
  4. Don Jones

    For me, regret is one of those words that likes to drag you into the past, then slingshot you into the future and ricochet back into the past. The more fundamental question is, “Am I ready to die (now)?” The answer to that question lies in the here and now.

    2 years ago
  5. s
    sb

    I have been lucky enough to have had a full life, full of loving relationships, so I like to think I wouldn’t have many regrets. I think my biggest regret would have to be filling my time with work, duty to others etc etc and therefore not always having time to be spontaneous with my husband or to properly listen to him and fully engage with his conversations, concerns and worries instead of listening with just one ear. I know they say no one on their death bed ever says they wish they had worked more -I often think of this and mean to address it but…….Maybe now I will. I will certainly try.

    2 years ago
  6. Dusty Su

    I’d be so pleased. I’ve died before, it’s great.

    I’d miss my partner though and be sad that COVID kept us apart. I didn’t get enough time with him.

    I’d have wished I updated my living will/advance directives and done a physical will.

    Due to do next week. So may I live long enough for that.

    2 years ago
  7. L
    Lauryn

    I would regret not learning how to develop and maintain meaningful relationships. I’m not sure how to tend to this —- I feel like this ability is innate and intuitive- learned from watching parents and relatives as a child. I’m not sure what happens when you don’t have that natural ability and you’re not really sure how to act.

    2 years ago
    1. sunnypatti48317

      I don’t think it’s all innate and intuitive. I had to learn how to do it. What I saw as a young child before my mother learned her own lessons on relationships was very unhealthy and not meaningful whatsoever. It definitely affected my relationships as a young woman, which is why my first marriage was such a toxic trainwreck. I had other issues to deal with, but I had to reprogram my mind, basically unlearning what I knew so I could develop new skills. I also had to learn to love myself. That, honestly, made the biggest difference for me. I wish you all the best, Lauryn.

      2 years ago
    2. Just be

      It requires skill. Skills can be learned, more easily in a class or with a therapist; barring that, they can be learned through observation, but that is more difficult. Some are born with a more innate ability, but that doesn’t means skills can’t be learned by the others. Been there.

      2 years ago
  8. Carol

    I have more or less given up on an important relationship. This question makes me realize that I need to work on it.

    2 years ago
  9. DeVonna

    I would regret that my daughter and I are not reconciled. She has not spoken to my husband and me for five years now. In that time our grandson has grown from an infant to a Kindergartner and has been joined by a little brother, whom we have never met. I love my daughter deeply and would give just about anything to be part of her life, but she does not desire it. So we have grieved and accepted this very unfortunate part of life. But we never give up hope that one day she will allow us to love her once again…

    2 years ago
    1. Javier Visionquest

      Same here, DeVonna.

      2 years ago
    2. Michele

      I will light a candle for you and your daughter.

      2 years ago
    3. Just be

      {{Hugs}}, DeVonna. I’m in the same situation, except there aren’t grandchildren. I try to be better myself and be happy with who I am. Regardless of if she comes back, I’ll still have that.

      2 years ago
  10. Katrina

    I don’t want to come to my death bed regretting anything, but I know I will. No matter how much I try to impart knowledge, love, insights, memories – you can’t make other people receive them the way you want them to. Doesn’t mean you should try, I guess. I do try. So I guess what I hope I have done by the time I’m on my death bed is to have loved without limits, listened with filters of love and acceptance as much as I can, served and spoken with justice and mercy on behalf of others, laughed and shared laughter extraordinarily, and spent as much time on a beach as possible.

    2 years ago
  11. Toni

    Make sure my papers were in order so I don’t stress out whoever is going to take care of my funeral according to my wishes. I am in the midst of cleaning out and organizing papers. My cousin has a book that gives details to her burial that she shared with my sister who also did the same. I didn’t want to because I thought it was morbid but I see it is necessary just in case. Of course that’s very practical. But this question I assume is about living. In that case I am doing the best I can day by day with what I have and pausing to take notice what I can along the way. The uncertainty of life is ever present so being aware of and not taking advantage of life in the moment is what I am paying attention to what is showing up. Last night my cousin finally agreed to talk to me about a condition she has had and finally took steps to feel relief instead of asking questions that could set her off, I listened. We had a good conversation and then went to a Reiki session together. So the art of allowing did us both good and there was a sharing of empathy between us. I could not ask for anything more. Living with more ease is what I am pursuing.

    2 years ago
    1. Michele

      My mother had written out exactly what to do when she died in a letter to my brother and I. It was so helpful and made everything that much easier during a difficult time. I have since done the same for my kids. In fact, a very close friend of mine asked for a copy of what she had written so she would know what to do for her father when he passed. Some people just really don’t know where to begin and what to do. Make it easy:)

      2 years ago
  12. Mike S

    Spending more time with my family, all grown but living on opposite sides of the country. We are already doing family zoom calls with some regularity, and I plan this Soring and summer to make personal visits.

    2 years ago
  13. SK

    I would regret not having gone to the Holy Land with Tom and Cheri when I had the chance; to not have seen the eagles in Haines, Alaska; to not have walked the Camino de Santiago and the northern Scotland walk to John O’ Groats; to not have located my ancestors and relatives in Scotland. To remedy this- I will walk the Camino virtually; plan a trip to Haines; save money for Scotland when the pandemic is over; do my ancestry and write letters.

    2 years ago
  14. Trish

    There are a couple of letters I want to write to try to capture the depth of my love: my two children, my ex-husband & my parents are at the top of the list. At some point soon I’ll carve out sacred time for these meaningful notes.

    2 years ago
  15. sunnypatti48317

    Travelling more. I want to see the world, but the only way I can tend to this today is to set some intentions, see myself visiting the places I want to visit, and hope that I live long enough to go everywhere on the list.

    2 years ago
1 2

Stay Grateful

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Give yourself the gift of free bi-monthly inspiration including uplifting articles, diverse stories, supportive practices, videos, and more, delivered with heart to your inbox.