Reflections

Please log in or Create a Profile to post a comment.

  1. MHS

    That I can change my mindset to live a more positive and fulfilling life.

    1 year ago
  2. Palm

    The perspective from Presence. As Mike says it’s not new, but I am becoming aware of it. It came as a sudden idea when I was at the park a few days ago, to perceive all I was seeing, as if with my whole body, like a child, with no thoughts. I bird with an orange curved beak was removing bark from a tree as if it wasn’t noticing me, I was standing so close. I started sleeping better and noticing more details, like the ceilings at the shopping centre and textures of surfaces. Then I came across a 7 day practice by Eckart Tolle and I learned to call it Presence. There are still challenges but I am grateful for this new perspective.

    1 year ago
  3. O.Christina

    To feel being part of a community and of humanity itself instead of just knowing it slowly appears as a new perspective. To see and feel it, alongside with trust and faith coming back. It almost is a change of paradigm inside, and might be the reason for only slowly adapting to it, for which I apologize. Thank you dearly for this question.

    1 year ago
  4. R
    Rahsaan Middleton

    The idea that fasting can save your life. I am grateful for this as I look forward to improving my health through this new perspective of how the body works.

    1 year ago
  5. Dusty Su

    I can be a thermostat, not a barometer.

    1 year ago
  6. Don Jones

    When I peeled away all the layers on an onion, I was left with nothing. It got me wondering if I would be the same. A delightful pool of nothingness, bubbling with infinite possibilities. What a delicious thought…

    1 year ago
  7. Maeve

    Going to be mundane here: During the pandemic I realized it was kind of fun having the “new perspective” of a little ponytail instead of a short haircut every few months.

    1 year ago
  8. Linda

    Learning to see relaxing as an essential part of living, rather than a sign of laziness.

    1 year ago
    1. Michele

      Love this!

      1 year ago
  9. L
    Lauryn

    The idea of letting go. The focus on living in harmony with another human being. Learning to relax.

    1 year ago
  10. Carol

    This question made me think of a quote from Pema Chodron: “Whatever moves us beyond self-centeredness sows positive seeds in our mind-stream. With the right causes and conditions, these seeds will blossom into fortunate circumstances. This good fortune is called “merit” and manifests as supportive outer conditions and mental states.” Personally my perspectives lately have not been sowing the best of seeds. Thankfully, I’m aware of that fact and as my 12 step sponsor used to say, “When you know better, you do better!” Wish me luck.

    1 year ago
    1. R
      Rahsaan Middleton

      Good Luck

      1 year ago
    2. Holly in Ohio

      Good luck, dear Carol.

      1 year ago
  11. Mark Piper

    Trying to see things from the perspective of my almost-seven-year-old. I have a (bad) habit of viewing and speaking (and expectations) to/of her like a mini-adult. She’s intelligent and precocious but a young child nonetheless. So, I’m trying to see things from her perspective so that I better understand and get less frustrated and can correct my expectations.

    1 year ago
  12. Mike S

    Not really new, but a further affirmation of how, in the process of simply observing mental contents, the mind begins to empty out. Then whatever unwanted feelings or thoughts were present fadeaway and peace returns.

    1 year ago
  13. Debra

    It opened up to me very recently after needing to euthanize my precious kitty cat on Monday. That despite what could feel like a dark period, she was a gift of joy to me. My perspective is that new beginnings are opening for me —- new opportunities to love again.

    1 year ago
    1. O.Christina

      Happy for your perspective and the joy, dear Debra. Your kitty cat will stay with you in your heart, and whenever you turn to her memory, the joy and love she brought will be present. Blessings to your beloved animal and to you, dear friend.

      1 year ago
    2. Holly in Ohio

      Well said, Debra.
      And I’m sorry for your loss, but I’m sure you were a gift in her life, also.

      1 year ago
  14. M
    Manali

    When I am facing crisis and struggling to get out of it, I cry and get angry on God for putting me in that circumstances. However, at the end I want God to just stay with me so that I can endure it.

    1 year ago
    1. Jenni Franklin

      I hear you. That reflection speaks for me as well.

      1 year ago
  15. Holly in Ohio

    I am reaching for new perspectives. It feels like trying to catch dandelion fluff on the wind.

    The first is the value of my own health, to give nurturing my health and fitness higher priority.

    The second is staying true to the causes and the work, even on days when I feel discouraged. It is me trying to figure out how not to feel discouraged about the climate crises coming, and not to feel discouraged by the indifference of so many people towards climate change, and their lack of compassion for people who are not like them.

    So I’m reaching for those wisps of hope, the wisps of seeds like the dandelion fluff, of promise, of hope.

    For me, today’s quote was PERFECT.

    I will love the light for it shows me the way, yet I will endure the darkness for it shows me the stars.

    OG MANDINO

    1 year ago
    1. Mike S

      Holly, thanks for bringing up climate change. I too do not feel optimistic and am discouraged by c,I ate denial and apathy. My only point of hope is that there is a larger wisdom at work. If humanity reduces its numbers through the climate crisis, nature may rebound.

      1 year ago
      1. Holly in Ohio

        Nature does correct over-populations, as a safety measure – though that thought is kind of grim in the midst of the current pandemic. You are right that nature rebounds, in fact I would go so far as to say nature ALWAYS rebounds. It just doesn’t always rebound in the same way (think poor dinosaurs). But you reminded me of extremophiles and other odd life on our planet that pretty much ensure that no matter what happens, some things will survive and thrive… things such as ecosystems at deep sea volcanic vents independent of photosynthesis, bacteria that eats radioactivity, microbes that live on ice comets (debated, but starting to gain credibility), archaeans that live in extreme acidity, alkalinity, heat, cold, or chemical concentrations, frogs and fish that dehydrate and reconstitute back into life, nature is truly miraculous! I do feel confident we cannot destroy all life and it gives me hope that nature has more wisdom in diversity and symbiotic relationships than humans have about our consequences. But we humans still need to get up to speed, and keep trying!!!! It is not too late if we all do what we can. We have to believe that.

        Mike, thank you so much for responding. It meant a lot to me today. I ALMOST didn’t go to the farm, but I did, and planted carrots. P.S. I think mosquitoes will survive the zombie apocalypse, lol.

        1 year ago
  16. Katrina

    As retirement and COVID collided, my plans for the next phase of my life imploded. My new perspective is that while I am an almost compulsive planner, I can live, enjoy, learn and thrive when plans have to be adjusted. And they need to be adjusted almost by the minute.

    1 year ago
  17. Christine

    I suddenly realized that the answers that I give here, I write to you, but also to myself. One day maybe I’ll go back and read everything I’ve written. And then I read my answer from today:
    I am stronger than I thought I would be.
    That’s a perspective, I guess. And a good reminder to myself in times of weakness.

    1 year ago
  18. Patricia

    I think that sometimes I’m just too tired to answer these questions. And it’s okay not to…. I read the question and it goes with me into the day – and I read the responses of others and those are often meaningful and helpful. So I guess the “new perspective” is about my relationship to these questions themselves. And what does it mean to be a (often peripheral) part of an online community?

    1 year ago
    1. Mike S

      I agree. Often my mind goes blank with these questions.

      1 year ago
    2. Holly in Ohio

      It is perfectly fine to “hold” the question. It might even be better, allowing you to reach for new insight, rather than a quick response. But I would not say you “are on the periphery.” I appreciate your comments and responses so much, and feel like I have gotten to know you a little bit. To me, you are every bit a part of this wonderful community!

      1 year ago
      1. Patricia

        Thank you, Holly….

        1 year ago
  19. Mary Pat

    That now is the time to be of help to a member of my family. I could not be there years ago, but I can be there for that person now.

    And when looking at another situation where a decision needs to be made…..
    To sort of sit back and watch all the pathways I could take unfold. Nothing has to be done immediately. To remember when I do this, I see new ways of looking at a situation, and new ideas present themselves…
    And, of course, to bring to mind that no answer can be a good answer in itself….

    1 year ago
  20. Kevin

    A few days ago, as I’m still trying to recover from a major back-pain setback, in which I’ve needed a walker and cane to get around the house, my whole family descended in late afternoon for family time, “refreshments,” take-out, all among seven grandkids swirling about ages three to sixteen.

    At one point, I’m lying on the floor sideways playing with wind-up toys with a few of the grandkids, when I needed to just get up, change my position, and find a chair. With what I thought was my cane and walker at the ready as I started to get up (It’s weird…I can stand up somewhat easily but not walk away…yet, without assistance) and looked around for my “tools.” One grandson had just taken off with my walker and rounded the corner for the kitchen, so I reached for my cane, and saw three-year-old River, with two hands firmly clutched on my cane saying, “Walk-n stick?” and she took off mimicking a hiker in the opposite direction. The whole fam seemingly saw this at the same time, me standing there, perplexed, smiling, wondering what to do next, as they all erupted in laughter at this snapshot in time. It was, for me, a beautiful moment, amplified when one daughter shouted, “Zachary! Bring Grampa’a walker back in here right now! And River, give Grampa back his walking stick!”

    A perspective on love, perhaps.

    1 year ago
    1. Patricia

      A lovely picture of a moment of love in a family…

      1 year ago
    2. Mary Pat

      Indeed! Isn’t it wonderful-that feeling of being surrounded by family-and feeling that love coming at you? I love it! I have had that these past several months, and it was the medicine I needed as much as the stuff in the bottles! And my great grandkids have no idea the love they are showering on me in unexpected ways…and I had no idea this wonderful stuff would ever happen for me…..miraculous.

      1 year ago
      1. Kevin

        So very true, Mary Pat!

        1 year ago
  21. devy

    How great and wonderful a person that I am! I often put the welfare and compassion of others over my needs but now realize that I need to focus more on me first. I often treat myself worse than how I treat others and put their needs over mine. I’ve also learned that when surrounded by negativity that even though I make an attempt to be grateful, accept things as they are and be mindful that if i am surrounded by others such as my wife who are not, that it brings me down and away. I need to take time just to get away, reset myself by being alone for a while then returning when ready. I am no good in supporting others if I don’t do this

    1 year ago
  22. Michele

    I just finished watching Netflix Series Surviving Death. The last episode on Reincarnation was very interesting. I enjoyed most of the series. (the two on Mediums, nope)

    1 year ago
  23. Howie Geib

    Postponement and the idea of delayed gratification. The new normal for me is a routine that does not include a sense of satisfaction in the moment. I am enduring my activities (remember I am an Uber driver, so I am sitting in traffic most of the time) and while this is not suffering, it is not thriving. It is work, good honest work, and has dignity. I am extremely grateful to have the work, don’t get me wrong. It is more a matter of my life not cultivating my intellect or utilizing my passions and skills. I am having to work longer hours (9-11 hours a day). The new perspective is that it is dawning on me that this is probably going to be my work for some time to come. And that is what it is.

    1 year ago

Stay Grateful

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Give yourself the gift of free bi-monthly inspiration including uplifting articles, diverse stories, supportive practices, videos, and more, delivered with heart to your inbox.