Reflections

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  1. barba

    Definitely answering these questions every morning. In doing so, I explore the previously unknown perspectives of my mind.
    To dare to look at my fears. The fear of life, of missing out, of people, of me … endlessly. This is the first step to opening the door and exploring the world.
    Nature as a reminder of how beautiful and strange everything is. So I stay curious.

    1 week ago
  2. Robin Ann

    One way is to learn with much interest and non-judgement at our Employee Resource Group meetings at work. So many groups of different cultures and backgrounds. We also celebrated Pride Month recently.

    1 week ago
    1. Michele

      🌈

      1 week ago
  3. Carol

    Willingness

    1 week ago
  4. M
    Miss Bonnie Cook

    Listening…

    1 week ago
  5. Antoinette

    Becoming the universe and meditation to the universe perspective helps me expand beyond my little mind world .

    1 week ago
    1. L
      Loc Tran

      Antoinette, this reminds me of when Shunryu Suzuki talked about big mind and small mind in “Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind.”

      1 week ago
  6. C
    Carly J

    I’m reading a book about IFS, internal family systems therapy (Altogether You by Jenna Riemersna) and it’s really shifting the way I see both myself and my loved ones.

    1 week ago
    1. Robin Ann

      Oh interesting, I shall check it out! tks

      1 week ago
  7. Pilgrim

    Life! Noticing & paying attention.

    1 week ago
  8. Barb C

    I love the use of the word “expand” in this question. It highlights the growth we’re experiencing when we shift our perspective to include more. Earlier this week I attended an online session on neurodivergence in our state’s diversity, equity and inclusion conference. The speaker described themself as “gender-expansive”, saying they didn’t want to define themselves as a negative–what they aren’t–by using “non-binary”. I loved the broadened perspective embedded in that word.

    Reading has been my perspective-expanding habit since I learned to read at age 4 (comes of having a mom who was a teacher; she put flashcards on everything in the house to teach me words). I especially love fantasy and science fiction, both of which give me “strange new worlds” to explore, and historical fiction that gives me a way into events of the past through the lives of the characters in whatever I’m reading.

    I didn’t used to pay much attention to the lives of the writers and what that meant about the perspectives they brought to their creations. In recent years I’ve made a point of seeking out works by people who have different characteristics from my own and from the vast majority of published authors in this country (mostly educated middle-class white men, usually with no disabilities, usually American-born and English-speaking). This has brought me to so many wonderful writers and a much richer view of the world.

    Fiction expands our ability to empathize and to view “different from me” as “still a lot like me in many ways”. We can imagine our way into expanded perspectives.

    1 week ago
    1. Mary Mantei

      Barb, everything about your response says, « expand ». Love it, thank you.

      1 week ago
    2. C
      Carly J

      I really connect to this. Just read a book called Martyr! by Kaveh Akbar (the audio is fantastic). It really expanded me!

      1 week ago
      1. Barb C

        Putting it on my list at the library. Thanks for sharing the title.

        1 week ago
  9. O.Christina

    Looking closely these days into the family mirror might help expand also to integrate the perspective of my peers by gratefully perceive from a kind of inner distance and letting go of some painful stuff which have been inburned to my soul, while in the same time allow deep compassion to be for all concerned, including me also.

    1 week ago
  10. L
    Loc Tran

    Reading “Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind” was a game-changer. Humility, emptiness, purity, and concentration were my biggest takeaways. I’m able to clean everything in my mind holding me back from the present, gain a deeper understanding of Asian cultures, and do things without expecting anything in return.

    1 week ago
  11. Nannette

    Thinking about the world as a whole and not just my own little world. There is so much going on in the world and with so many people. We need to be aware …that although we live in a microcosm…we need to b aware of the world and all its problems as a whole.

    Just want to say hello once again to all the good folks here. I have had a real bout of it!! After being treated for pneumonia…I was not getting one bit better. I thought it may be Covid…and sure enough that was the culprit. My husband and I are now on the road to recovery. Thank the Good Lord. It sure has been sobering to be so ill. Wishing all who come here…Good Health and Happiness!!

    1 week ago
    1. Mary Mantei

      Continued health and healing, Nanette.

      1 week ago
    2. Michele

      Glad to hear you and your husband are feeling better. My dad just recently had Covid for the very first time too.

      1 week ago
    3. Joseph McCann

      There is no place like healthy, Nannette. Good to hear.

      1 week ago
    4. Robin Ann

      Hope you both are feeling better each and every day!

      1 week ago
    5. Betsy Rodman / Grateful Living

      So glad to hear that you and your husband are on the mend Nannette!

      1 week ago
    6. Barb C

      I’m so glad you’re both getting better!

      1 week ago
    7. L
      Loc Tran

      Nannette, I’m glad you and your husband are doing better. As far as our own little world and the big world goes, it’s good to know the world beyond our own. It’s easy to get stuck on our own problems.

      1 week ago
  12. sunnypatti

    Interacting with others and listening to them. Doing the kind of work I’ve done all my life has had me dealing with all kinds of people, so I have heard many stories that have opened my eyes to others’ experiences.

    1 week ago
  13. Ngoc Nguyen

    There was a man. As I got closer to him, I saw he was painting. I saw many pictures around him. Then, I asked the man why he was painting so many pictures. He answered, “To send to my debtors. When I give them pictures, I may receive some money from them in return.” It was just a dream I had last night. I woke up, thought about that dream, and laughed at how silly the man was. As part of my routine, I opened my computer and listened to today’s Gospel. Finally, I realized that the painter in my dream wasn’t silly in what he did. The Gospel today was about the burden of anger. Through the Gospel, instead of immersing himself in anger because of the debtors, he channeled his emotions into art. It’s rare that I can remember a dream after waking up, but I still recall the picture the man was painting and the pictures surrounding him, which depicted the beauty of nature. I don’t know if the man could get some money back from his debtors, but at least he released his anger, as mentioned in today’s Gospel.
    Well, this dream and today’s Gospel taught me that embracing different perspectives can be helpful. If someone owes you money, go draw them a picture, said the man.

    1 week ago
    1. L
      Loc Tran

      My Ngoc, what a powerful and productive way to channel our anger. Chances of getting that money back is slim to none.

      1 week ago
    2. D
      Deann

      Thank you so much for sharing. A great lesson and story to remember.

      1 week ago
  14. Mary Mantei

    Good rest, talking a situation through with a trusted other, time, quiet, and going outdoors.

    1 week ago
  15. Laura

    Setting aside my own point of view to hear from others.

    1 week ago
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