Reflections

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  1. Mica

    The wonderful ‘bomb cyclone’ that hit my top floor balcony a couple days ago.

    1 year ago
    1. Sandra

      Mica, what is a bomb cyclone? I hope it hasn’t caused damage or injury.

      1 year ago
      1. Mica

        My son and his neighbors had ~2 days of half the power out in their house – 100% better than a total power outage, he says. Google gave me this: “bomb cyclone – a rapid drop in atmospheric pressure –” and the news items are all for bomb cyclones in New England now – the other coast from ‘mine’. Thanks, Sandra, for your interest 🤗

        1 year ago
        1. Sandra

          Thank you for explaining this, Mica. I’ve just found an article in a UK newspaper describing the storms on both coasts. They sound very intense.

          1 year ago
          1. Mica

            They are, especially when they’re ‘pointed’ in your direction, and you’re on the top floor. But I’m so grateful to the bomb cyclone for giving me the opportunity to refurbish and rearrange the plants and things on my balcony. I’ve decided that I love turning trash into treasure, which is what I’m doing with my shutter garden, made from thrift store shutters about 10 yrs ago and badly damaged. My next door neighbor and I have opposite political persuasions, but we bonded over both being people for whom ‘one person’s trash is another person’s treasure’. It has been wonderful to bond, finally, this year, after 11 yrs of living next to each other. Warm wishes to you, Sandra 🤗

            1 year ago
  2. Sandra

    My parents. They are both very frail, very fragile. Every day is a huge individual struggle for them and it can be heart-breaking for us daughters to witness their daily battles. But they do not complain and they do not give up. Each of them has come close to death many times now. Almost weekly we are faced with another challenge which may be the final one. Yet they are here. And they strive to enjoy whatever blessings are available to them. I am in awe of their resilience. And I learn.

    1 year ago
  3. Don Jones

    The breath, the inhale, then the exhale. If it stops, I am gone in an instant. The design is perfection … fragile yet robust at the same time.

    1 year ago
  4. pkr

    Being my beloved brother Kerry’s caretaker for 10 months. Watching him fight his illness & remain optimistic & positive. Observing his struggles, his vision loss, his inability to walk, his confusion, his steady decline. Being the only one witnessing his path to the end. Watching him take his last breath. And now my own strength & resilience to go forward, to carry on. To put the sadness behind me, to tuck it away & strengthen myself. This loss has been quite the lesson about fragility & resilence.
    I am living it. 🙏❤️🙏

    1 year ago
    1. Sandra

      pkr thank you for sharing this. My own path has parallels as we support our parents in their final chapter of life and I think back also to when my sister walked a path similar to your brother’s. I am replying to you before posting my own response to this question which I’ve been reflecting on all day. Your words give me strength. I send blessings and gratefulness as you live with this profound experience 💗

      1 year ago
      1. pkr

        Thank you Sandra. Peace & Love to you & your family.🙏❤️🙏

        1 year ago
    2. Linda

      I am very sorry for the loss of your brother, pkr. He was so fortunate to have you as his caretaker.

      1 year ago
      1. pkr

        Thank you Linda.

        1 year ago
  5. L
    Lauryn

    cats. My partner lost his two 13 year old cats in the past year – both rather suddenly- and with little explanation….I lost my last cat quite suddenly as well to a stroke /heart attack. These little beings are so fragile. Yet as I sit outside in the mornings I’m greeted by the outdoor cats who I feed who have no real homes, but are still comfortable enough to come close enough to pet. These little guys have just endured one of the worst storms we’ve had in years, yet I still see them outside relaxing on my porch enjoying the sunshine.

    1 year ago
    1. Michele

      I relate to this – I lost my Beans in July and miss him so much. For around two weeks now I’ve been feeding a stray cat who showed up in my backyard. I’ve named her Daphne. Last night she actually came in my lanai – I opened the screen door. I moved the food and water inside there now. I peeked and she was curled up on the blanket I have on my sofa out there. I felt such joy. All I want is to pet her. Patience, patience, patience. I looked this morning before coming onto the website and she is gone. I can’t wait to get home from work and start the process over again.

      1 year ago
    2. Sandra

      Lauryn, I lost a beloved cat 4 years ago and I think of her often despite being so thankful for the two new cats which have joined our household. At the weekend I was with my daughter and her family who have just acquired two kittens. I picked one up and she sat in the palm of my hand, bones so light and fragile like a bird’s. These tiny creatures danced among us all, quite fearless of our big feet. When we sat down to lunch one of them crept onto my lap and curled up. I felt hugely privileged. Our cats give us so much. And it is so painful when they go. We learn so much from them 💗

      1 year ago
  6. sunnypatti48317

    This is the perfect time of year for this question. Mother Nature is definitely one of our biggest teachers, and the changing season with less daylight (at least in the northern hemisphere) reminds me that life is fragile, yet it does not give up, thus the resiliency. My tomato plants are gone, but my peppers are still strong for now….much like humans where we have our seasons. I am in a fortunate position of being around a lot of people daily due to my retail job, and now that I am running Whole Body, even if it’s only a week in, I have already dealt with young, healthy customers looking for life enhancing supplements and customers who have been on death’s door, looking for things to boost their immunity, increase their appetite or whatever. While I remind these people that they should consult their physicians, I am grateful to be able to deal with and assist people at various stages of life. And it’s really always fragile, as we never know what is going to happen. I pray for strength and resiliency for us all, mother nature included 🙏🏼

    1 year ago
    1. Holly in Ohio

      I’ve been thinking about nature today, too, Sunnypatti. When I went for a walk I picked up more autumn leaves, now “dead,” and yet full of color and interesting. This annual death is cleansing, but the tree is not dead. The wildflower may be just a brown stalk now, but the seeds may be on the stalk or on the ground. I picked up some maple seeds, too, that were on a stone sidewalk. I’m going to try to make a terrarium for a neighboring child, and I thought I might be able to get some of these seeds started (as I’ve done before for a terrarium). All of these things, and what people have written about their cats and their family members, reminds us of the fragility of individual lives. But life itself, nature in its stunningly beautiful diversity, and our families… these are resilient. All of us are especially fragile when we are born, and fragile again usually before we leave this earth, but we are also resilient in living and enduring. My garden is going to sleep for the winter now, and one day I will take my own long sleep. But many people I have touched will be here to carry on. My children (who incidentally are not of my body), will carry on. I was not sure how to respond to this question until I read your reply to this question, and then I remembered the leaves I picked up, the seeds I picked up, and the now dull looking goldenrod in the back yard that just a few weeks ago was strong and bright yellow and food for honeybees. And for just a moment in mind mind….fragility and resilience were one and the same. Thank you, SunnyPatti. ❤

      1 year ago
      1. sunnypatti48317

        Thank you for sharing that, Holly! I’m glad I could help spark your answer for the question, and I always love reading about what’s going on in your neck of the woods. We have tons of goldenrod down here, and it’s still bright yellow. But as we drove home from the beach yesterday, I was looking at the marsh as we crossed a bridge over the Intracoastal, and noticed it’s fading into brown as the ocean temps start to cool off. I say every year that I am going to embrace the cooler weather and winter, but it’s always a struggle as I hate being cold. But I am going to try again this year, because I am in a stage of life where I’m going thru some changes as well, so it’s a great year for me to learn to truly embrace all of the seasons rather than just my favorites. Not to forget my 18 year old kitty who is going thru so much himself. Instead of being scared, I’m grateful for each day we get to share 🐈‍⬛

        1 year ago
        1. Holly in Ohio

          Winters can be hard on old kitties. My old kitty and I both have arthritis. He loves to warm up his cold paws on me. Man! They are so cold sometimes!

          For millennia humans have marked the winter solstice by celebrating the promise and hope of renewal. I’m not sure “loving” winter is always needed… maybe its more about accepting winter, appreciating it for what it is, and faith that spring will return?

          I like your little kitty emoji! 🐈

          1 year ago
  7. Marnie Jackson

    The fragility scares me – so I honestly try not to dwell on it too much. However, there are moments when I realize how easily everything can change (usually when someone is late and I am fearful of some kind of tragedy).
    The resilience – I see everyday. Working in a school with so many students – I see mistakes and hard things happen – and yet students come back day after day.

    1 year ago
  8. Howie Geib

    I am able to spend time in the Everglades and the Keys. These fragile and intertwined ecosystems teach me many things. I am aware of the way these natural systems are able to recalibrate and find balance even after devastating disruptions. Even our current climate which seems at first to be withering the reefs and the brackish bays. Don’t get me wrong, there is damage, there is upheaval. And yet the overwhelming evidence suggests that one way or another life will out. Much may be lost in the process.

    1 year ago
  9. Mary Pat

    My bought with Covid. At the same time I had to go through with a biopsy, it could not wait-which gratefully was negative-and that put both “up front” for me. These two things have changed my perspective completely. Grateful? Too small a word……but what it holds is limitless for me now…..

    1 year ago
    1. Sandra

      Mary Pat, I am so happy to read that the biopsy was negative. Such experiences throw into relief what is truly important. Thank you for sharing this 🙏

      1 year ago
  10. Carla

    If I rise early enough, I see the beautifully etched and painted morning frost on the grass and remaining milk weed pods. I believe the flowers, grass and monarchs will return next spring. Everything and everyone needs a season to die and be reborn.

    1 year ago
    1. Sandra

      This is beautiful, Carla. Thank you 🙏

      1 year ago
  11. Kevin

    Time, and being with and caring for people as way opens, teaches me about the fragility, resilience and wonder of life.

    1 year ago
    1. Mike

      I became acquainted with the ideas of “way opening” and “way closing” through the writings of Parker Palmer some years ago in his Let Your Life Speak. It has been a helpful way of seeing things since then and I have shared it with others as occasion warranted.

      1 year ago
      1. Kevin

        Hello Mike,
        Parker Palmer, among his many undertakings, served as Dean of Studies and Writer in Residence at Pendle Hill, a renowned Quaker Retreat Center in PA many years ago. Though not a member of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) himself, he has incorporated many Quaker principles into his life’s work and writings.

        The phrase, “as way opens” is a term that has been used sparingly by Friends for centuries, and it is often assumed that “way opens” not by human desire alone, but with the grace and presence of that of God, or Spirit, as well.

        1 year ago
  12. Michele

    Working for a Tissue Bank teaches me about the fragility of life. I see everyday that someone has died and then one of their last wishes is to help others. It is sad but also rewarding.
    The other part of the question – resilience of life – I’ve seen amazing people with such strong will power have a resilience of life. Living a grateful life because you are never guaranteed tomorrow.

    1 year ago
  13. Christine

    Grief.

    1 year ago

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