Reflections

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  1. Robin Ann

    This site and everyone’s reflections is a role model to me. Life can be hard but having others to help us manage to get through it is a blessing.
    Learning and growing in our own journeys of gratefulness seems to be one good way to help.

    7 months ago
  2. Nannette

    This group is a role model of contentment for me…so many different views and things to think of….What an amazing group of people. Thank you!

    7 months ago
  3. C
    Christopher Le Flore

    My best friend’s dad. I think his contentment is a component of his faith in god and himself. He is able to be content with what he has, because he knows that god will always provide what he needs. I think that being content requires us to have faith that our needs will likely always be met. That even if we don’t get what we desire, we will have what we need. I think it requires us to suspend our egos, passions, desires, and recognize that we are and have enough right now in this moment.

    All we really have to do is live and die. We create all of the discontent ourselves by way of desire and ego.

    I just joined this today, as I’m trying to keep actively journaling, and free-form seems to be a bit boring lately. I’ve lived a life of abundance in which most things I sought have come to me, yet still find myself wanting more and struggling to recognize all that I have and stay humble, grateful, and thankful. I’m hoping this site helps!

    7 months ago
    1. Mary Mantei

      Welcome Christopher. Your words, “…we create all of the discontent ourselves, by way of desire and ego.”, is a takeaway reminder for me. Thank you so much!

      7 months ago
    2. Carol

      Christopher, Welcome and thanks for your thoughts and the wisdom they contain. Your words “All we really have to do is live and die. We create all of the discontent ourselves by way of desire and ego.” The way of the ego reminded me of a short reflection I wrote a few years ago:

      Recognizing Our Own Truth or Matter Matters by C. Conner

      We have trouble recognizing,
      because we are geared to denying
      our own truth.

      We’re hung up on analyzing,
      collecting and fantasizing
      our own story.

      We’re so busy knowledge-ing,
      there’s no room left for knowing
      our true Self.

      We’re so intent on fact finding,
      finite and dualistic thought-mining
      that we miss the heart of the matter.

      You matter
      I matter
      Choices Matter!

      Behold the gift of life
      Share and care for it
      NOW

      7 months ago
    3. Robin Ann

      Welcome to the group! A lot of what you wrote regarding your best friend’s Dad I learned at an Advent event this week-end. Monsignor spoke at a Cathedral in Providence. Lots of food for thought!

      7 months ago
  4. Dolores Kazanjian

    My dog, Helios. He is content with a pet, a meal, a treat a chance to play with other dogs, a belly rub, a walk, a place to nap, chasing squirrels in the backyard. He was abused as a pup (how can people do that!?) but doesn’t spend the rest of his life sucking his thumb about it, but is just grateful for the happy home he lucked into. He never complains that supper is late or his bed is not changed, and certainly doesn’t waste time worrying about what people think of him or how he compares to other dogs.
    I am not sure that humans can ever achieve that level of complete contentment, but a few who appear to have come close are Desmond Tutu, Michael Curry, David Steindl-Rast and Richard Rohr.

    7 months ago
  5. Don Jones

    I think Bella (my dog) is expert level contentment. Whenever she doesn’t like something she either shakes it off or goes outside and kicks up a bit of grass. Then it is done.

    7 months ago
    1. Dolores Kazanjian

      Once again, Don we are of like mind. I did not see your post before I commented. My dog was the first thing that came to mind when I read the question.

      7 months ago
  6. Barb C

    My mom in her early old age before her vascular dementia developed. She exemplified grace and contentment. I don’t know that I ever heard her say this but her general attitude was “Glass half full? Glass half empty? I’m just happy to have a glass!”

    She and my dad grew up during the Depression (born in 1921 and 1917, respectively). They went through a lot of hardships in families that didn’t have much money. My dad was an Army Air Corps bomber pilot in World War II, came home and worked most of his life at the lumber mill in our town, rising to management with no college degree. Mom was a teacher, then raised the six of us. They had a life with much more material wealth than their parents had had. I think that contrast made them both much more contented with what they had than people who’ve had lots of things all their lives often are. I recognize how fortunate I am and have no need to strive for “more”, whatever that represents, so their example seems to have sunk in.

    7 months ago
  7. Charlie T

    Great question. A cause for pause.
    Most people I know are struggling with
    contentment. Including myself. I think
    overall contentment, can be very elusive.
    As I search my brain for friends, colleagues,
    hero’s, and spiritual guides, I am struck
    by the fact that none of these people
    were/are totally content. As a thinking
    person, I can find temporary contentment
    and contentment in some areas of my life.
    I guess from what I know about the Buddha,
    I would say that this might be my role model
    for contentment. The release of desire,
    striving, and comparison might be the
    path. But I’m not sure this path has a
    destination. It’s just a path.

    7 months ago
    1. Carol

      Just BE

      7 months ago
  8. Carol

    Who is a role model for contentment in my life? Why?

    My son…Why? Let me count the ways.

    1. He not only always see the cup half full, he is willing to share its contents even when it is almost empty.
    2. When I wish him a good day, he responds, “Every day is a good day, Mama.”
    3. He is dyslexic and struggled with school but I do not know any one with a greater level of comprehension of new information than my son. He learns in a different way but he displays a wealth of knowledge on many subjects.
    4. He lives with nagging back pain from a spinal defect which was aggravated by a work injury years ago but he never says, “Why me?” He has a “Why not me?” frame of mind. “What is IS and how to make the best of it is his motto.”
    5. He loves unconditionally and he and his wife will celebrate their 40th wedding anniversary in 2024.

    These are just a few of the ways he has always been “a role model for contentment” in the lives of all who cross his path.
    I am so privileged to be his Mom. He has and will always be my teacher.

    7 months ago
  9. sunnypatti

    Each of you here 🙂 I haven’t posted as much lately, but I still come to read and get my boost from the wisdom you all share daily. Thank you!

    7 months ago
  10. Ngoc Nguyen

    I would say all doctors are my role models for contentment. Especially my eye doctor. Remember when I stayed in the hospital for the glaucoma treatment, my mom and dad could be there during the nine-to-five time, I was followed by my eye doctor to the labs for lots of checking up. I don’t know why at that moment, I suddenly wished that he was my father (of course, I have a respective father). Since that time, every time I saw a tall man in a white coat, there is a sense of truth, protection, and satisfaction fulfilled my heart.

    7 months ago
  11. Yram

    This is a very good question. I don’t know I can come up with a name. Those folks who “flow” with life seem to be content.

    7 months ago
  12. Kevin

    I’d have to say that a couple of my Quaker elders, who have passed some years ago, serve me still as ongoing models of contentment, even though each had significant life challenges of their own to deal with.

    7 months ago
    1. Michele

      Welcome back Kevin 🙂

      7 months ago
    2. Nannette

      Kevin. I am so happy you are back again…Indeed you have been a role model of contentment for me. Hoping that you are doing well.

      7 months ago
      1. Kevin

        Hello Nannette, thanks for your caring note to me yesterday. My daily routines have been upended lately due to contractors working on our home lately, and in conjunction with a serious uptick in my pain levels due to Ankylosing Spondyloarthritis, something I’ve been dealing with for some time now. But again, thank you for your kind note.

        7 months ago
    3. Don Jones

      Hi Kevin. Great to see you.

      7 months ago
      1. Kevin

        Thank you, Don. Good to see others and good to be seen! My best to you my friend!

        7 months ago
    4. Anna

      Hi dear Kevin, I am happy to see you again!

      7 months ago
      1. Kevin

        Thank you, Anna.

        7 months ago
    5. Carol

      Kevin, You have been a role model for so many of us and it’s pure joy to see you here today!

      7 months ago
      1. Kevin

        Such kink words, Carol. Thank you, truly.
        My daily routines have been upended lately due to contractors working on our home lately, and in conjunction with a serious uptick in my pain levels due to Ankylosing Spondyloarthritis, something I’ve been dealing with for some time now.
        Thanks again!

        7 months ago
        1. Carol

          Kevin, So sorry to hear that you are experiencing an uptick in in your pain levels. I keep the quote about chronic pain that you were kind enough to share with me right next to my computer. It has been very helpful to me. I’m back in physical therapy and am receiving dry needling treatments. Too early to tell how effective they will be but I’m thankful they are being offered. Hope the contractors working in your home will finish the job soon so you can get back to your daily routines without interruption. Blessings to you and yours.

          7 months ago
          1. Kevin

            Thank you, very much, Carol. Hope that your treatments help you. I worked with a physiatrist for a while and she did some “trigger-point” injections. Not sure if this is the same or similar to your treatments. For me, they didn’t do much, but that was before they diagnosed me with Ankylosing Spondylitis, and zeroing in on my SI joints…the most painful joints compared to other joints. I received acupuncture also for two years. Felt good, but didn’t last very long. I’m with a PT now, paying out of pocket, who specializes with older patients and doesn’t do what I call, “cookie-cutter” PT that is the norm with most kinds of PT out there. Been with PT for a year, every week, and helps tremendously.
            Again though, wishing you good luck with your treatments. Happy holiday season to you and your family!

            7 months ago
    6. Josie

      So good to “see” you here again in written words, Kevin.

      7 months ago
    7. O.Christina

      Happy to see you back, dear Kevin! Hope all is well with you? You have been missed dearly, friend of so long.

      7 months ago
      1. Kevin

        Thank you, my friend, for your kind words here.
        My daily routines have been upended due to contractors working on our home lately, and in conjunction with a serious uptick in my pain levels due to Ankylosing Spondyloarthritis, something I’ve been dealing with for some time now. But again, thank you for your kind note.

        7 months ago
  13. Michele

    Actually, everyone who participates here on the Daily Question. I learn from each of you and coming onto this website brings me so much contentment. Thank you all.
    I will light a candle (another thing I love about this site) in remembrance of Pearl Harbor today.

    7 months ago
    1. Michele

      Thank you everyone for your comments – I wanted to share a reflection of a dear friend of mine (one of my Timoney Irish Dancer friends). She wrote this and it made me think of all of you. She writes so beautifully about many things.
      Good evening, the Taps have been played, the shots fired, the families had received their Flags from a grateful nation and Pearl Harbor took its place in history as a day of infamy. The families lost husbands, wives, sons, daughters, friends and neighbors, hearts broke, tears flowed and minds could not accept the horror, as for some families their only good byes were at a sight observing the Arizona which was sunk with many aboard. It was a pleasant day, sunny, warm, friends shared a cup of coffee, plans were made for the weekend, perhaps some were looking forward to going home but the enemy had other plans and while our military men and women, some perhaps were non military employees walked along the beach, walking to their offices, going back to their barracks after working the night shift their world exploded and because they were trained, they flew to planes only to find them on fire, sailors rushed to ships only to find them sinking, friends rushed to those wounded, some dying in their arms, medical ships began the rush to give medical aid and consolation but what they found refused to be believed. It happened many years ago yet each year we remember and we pray for those who give up their lives, for families who year after year, cried again, 12/7/1941 May today be a day of remembrance, where those who suffered on that day can be saluted and may their stay in Heaven be saluted by all those veterans who followed them in their by keeping America free……………………mec

      7 months ago
    2. Kevin

      Thank you, Michele, for reminding my yesterday of the importance of that date! It seems to get barely mentioned these days.

      7 months ago
    3. Robin Ann

      My Dad mentioned not even seeing anything about Pearl Harbor on TV today. He is 87. I worked for Electric Boat (submarine builder) a division of General Dynamics for a couple of years and knew they mentioned it on Linkedin. I was thinking today that he must have been a bit frightened as a child. I think of my children when Sept 11th happened and they were very young.

      7 months ago
    4. Dolores Kazanjian

      Thank you for remembering, Michele. I looked at the calendar earlier today and said, “Oh, my goodness, it’s Pearl Harbor Day.” There was little if any press coverage today. I was about 7 when WWII started, and to my generation Pearl Harbor Day was a very big day, indeed. It used to get a lot of attention and remembrance. Over the years it has diminished until now it is hardly mentioned. Maybe that’s because , since that war, we have never been not at war somewhere. Some declared, some “unofficial.” Perhaps we’ve just become numb to all the war, just as we have to all the mass shootings (almost one a week), the drug overdoses, the crazy weather patterns, and so forth. No wonder the younger generations are, for the most part, so turned off. What a world we are leaving them!

      7 months ago
    5. Pilgrim

      Thank you, Michele. My Dad was in that war, and that he made it home was indeed a miracle.

      7 months ago
      1. Carol

        Pilgrim, My Dad, too. Army Air Corp…B-17 top turret gunner…32 bombing missions over Germany and also blessed he came home

        7 months ago
        1. Pilgrim

          My Dad was also in the Army Air Corp, and much the same. When I think back to how young he was … how young they all were … it really does feel miraculous.

          7 months ago
  14. Joseph McCann

    Our dog Pooch. I can leave to town and be gone a couple of hours and Pooch is as full of joy and contentment the same as if I have been gone for a few days. When things do not go her way, the bewilderment only seems to last a nano second and boom……..content again. Dogs that have human companions who care for them make watching the ASPCA adds that much sadder to endure. Have a fine day all and scratch your pets behind the ear, if you have one, for me!

    7 months ago
    1. Barb C

      I wasn’t coming up with anyone and your answer made me realize my cat Tiggs (short for Tigger) is a pretty good example of contentment much of the time. He has a crabby streak so I’m not always contented with his behavior and I read human feelings into his actions, but for all I know he’s perfectly contented when he cuffs at my hands when I’m working. Right now he’s playing with a crinkly foil ball I brought out and having a wonderful time.

      7 months ago
    2. Josie

      You are a model of contentment to me, Joseph.
      The way you have embraced your life with both its darkness & its light is teaching me so much. Keep on posting, my friend!

      7 months ago
  15. Pilgrim

    Thinking of you, Kevin, and praying all is well.

    7 months ago
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