Reflections

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  1. Anna

    More passion for what I am working on, or what I am pondering.

    4 weeks ago
  2. Robin Ann

    Problems usually do need to be addressed. Being curious may take the anxiety or panic out of the equation! Normally I do tend to research and look for a possible answers or solutions when I have problems to address.

    4 weeks ago
  3. O.Christina

    possibly dealing with situations with more flexibility, creativity might enhance and with it, possibly more lightness.

    4 weeks ago
  4. C
    Chucky Puppet on Strings

    Not my idea but heard it recently…in my own answer from their idea of problems being challenges…so in a more constructive mindset it becomes a growth opportunity to challenge my static thinking or push the envelope so to say into new pathways allowing room for more strength and insight

    edit: wow am I greedy for more brainpower and brawn apparently rethinking that…how about it could let my limited tunnel-esque perception be opened a little bit more and more with each new learning experience of a curious challenge I can run from or face head-on

    4 weeks ago
  5. Dolores Kazanjian

    I have trouble with this question. I don’t see problems. I only see actions and consequences.

    4 weeks ago
  6. L
    Lauren Calvert

    The response changes! Perhaps it changes to a non-response. Perhaps there is not really any problem to be solved at all. And surely I am changed and am open to new perspectives and showing compassion. I am permitted to set aside my ego and to not bulldoze my way through this earth.

    4 weeks ago
  7. Ngoc Nguyen

    Many times when I enter this site, I read the question and find myself confused. I often end up reading all your reflections to understand the meaning of the question. It’s quite helpful compared to looking up each word in the dictionary to understand the question.

    4 weeks ago
  8. Charlie T

    Being curious and open, is a better way
    for me to problem solve. I rather enjoy
    problem solving. Reminding myself that
    I have been given this opportunity and
    try and enjoy the process.
    Now, I think what the question is getting
    at, is helping others, and the annoying
    tendency to try and solve others problems
    with suggestions and solutions.
    Yes, this is a good reminder to ask
    questions and listen with intention, when
    trying to be of service to others.

    4 weeks ago
    1. Avril

      I like how you spun that Charlie

      4 weeks ago
  9. Carol

    When I shift from problem-solving mode to approaching a situation with curiosity, what changes? I forsake the role of “fixer” and see more clearly. I find that I can relate to the situation from my heart not just my head. I don’t need to solve as much as accept what is. This strengthens my capacity to be compassionate with myself and others.

    4 weeks ago
    1. Avril

      I agree

      4 weeks ago
  10. Josie

    While enlightening (as always) to read everyone’s response, my personal reflection was guided by today’s powerful quote from Brene Brown….
    “Authenticity is the daily practice of letting go of who we think we’re supposed to be and embracing who we are.”

    4 weeks ago
    1. Avril

      Amen

      4 weeks ago
  11. J
    John

    For me, this change almost happens “organically”, that is, almost without me consciously thinking. It may well be that since I am a retiree, problems rarely arrive with the promise that it’ll take too much of a commitment of time. Nonetheless, the switch to curiosity seems to engage me more, and I learn more than necessary to just solve. I learn for me and my wife, and it is often fascinating.

    4 weeks ago
  12. Avril

    I need to tattoo this daily question on my wrist! When I consider a situation a problem instead of an opportunity, it invites constriction. The word “curious” is expansive. When I say “curiosity,” I invite infinite possibilities. When I say “problem,” I denote a “lack-mentality.” Many times, a situation has worked out so differently than I could imagine. These seemingly miraculous occurrences are because the Divine is infinitely creative. When I have pronoia, I acknowledge that magic is possible. Thank you for this question today. I have many irons on the fire, and I love the reminder that my community and the Divine support me.

    4 weeks ago
    1. Barb C

      Thank you for the opportunity to learn the definition of “pronoia”, Avril. I could unpack it as an opposite of paranoia, but the actual definition I found is beautiful: “A belief that people conspire to do one good.” And conspire’s root lies in breathing together. Beautiful.

      4 weeks ago
      1. Avril

        It’s one of my favorite words.

        4 weeks ago
    2. Josie

      Lovely, creative description, Avril. Thank you.

      4 weeks ago
  13. Antoinette

    Right now my problem is about house improvements! How do I know when or if something is necessary to do? Being a home owner is not easy! I can also see it from the view point of gratefulness that I have a home that’s keeping me warm from the cold right now ! I think it’s easy to get lost in worries about what if this or that is t done and the mind gets all stressed out by what if this or that ! So do I have to replace all the windows now or can I just leave them be? I’m curious about your advice! How’s that? I’m alone now and I really don’t know what I have to do!

    4 weeks ago
    1. Michele

      Updating your windows is an improvement to your home which will add equity. Whether you do one or all it is still an improvement. Good luck:)

      4 weeks ago
    2. Avril

      I don’t think it’s about belittling a particular situation. I think this question is to evoke the use of the word problem. There is a real situation with your home. The reality is cold and rain getting in the house. However, I think this question is to help spark creativity about options. Homeownership is a gift and it can be daunting. I empathize with what’s happening. We can still be grateful and perplexed at the same time.

      4 weeks ago
      1. Yram

        A question I would ask is how long do I plan to be in the house? Why do I need to replace them? Astitics? Safety? Lowered heating bills? Etc.

        4 weeks ago
  14. Mary Mantei

    As a youngster, I read all the Nancy Drew books. Maybe that is how I learned to enjoy solving a good problem. Problems come in all shapes and sizes. As do solutions. Curiosity often leads me to creativity, stretching my options.

    4 weeks ago
    1. Michele

      I did too, wow, almost forgot. This makes me remember playing the game Clue too.

      4 weeks ago
    2. Carol

      I also enjoyed reading Nancy Drew!

      4 weeks ago
    3. Robin Ann

      I loved her books too, glad to hear they may be still popular.

      4 weeks ago
    4. Dolores Kazanjian

      She was my favorite, too.

      4 weeks ago
  15. Joseph McCann

    Today’s question is a perplexing one. Many problems are only problems if allowed to be a problem. Trying to solve anything that does not require solving can become quite frustrating. When a person does not want to eat what is prepared and food is available two problems arise. Hunger still exists and discontent enters, even though food is available. With curiosity one may explore what is it about a situation that it appears problematic. Many times, a person misplaced in the woods, mountains or even an unfamiliar city would view it as a problem but to greet the situation with some curiosity, they would find out they are not lost but are in the very spot that they are right now, calm a bit and then move on in the right direction. I read a line from Eckhart Tolle that addressed this. To paraphrase: You have a problem that arises. You recognize this problem. You may need to take steps to solve this problem but cannot take action yet. So right now, do you have a problem? Or are you just future tripping on this problem, creating more mental anguish and problems. Curiosity killed the cat; satisfaction brought it back.

    4 weeks ago
    1. Josie

      Once again, your example, written so engagingly, brought me right back to the present moment, which is all I really inhabit. Thanks, Joseph.

      4 weeks ago
    2. Journey

      Thank you Joseph! So many great points in your reflection. I will be thinking about these all day. I especially liked the part “You have a problem that arises. You recognize this problem. You may need to take steps to solve this problem but cannot take action yet. So right now, do you have a problem?”

      4 weeks ago
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